Hampshire County Council

Executive Member, Policy & Resources Item

11 July 2002

Trading Standards National Performance Framework

Report by the Director of Property, Business and Regulatory Services

Contact: Tony Langstone Ext: 6619

1

Summary

1.1

The following decision is sought:

That approval be given to the National Performance Framework for the County Council's Trading Standards Service as detailed in Appendix 1 of this report.

2

Reason(s)

2.1

To meet the requirements of the Department of Trade and Industry to address inconsistencies nationally within the Trading Standards service highlighted by the Audit Commission in its report `Measure for Measure'.

3

Other options considered and rejected

3.1

Not applicable.

4

Conflicts of interest declared by the decision-maker or a member or officer consulted

4.1

Not applicable

5

Dispensation granted by the Standards Committee

5.1

Not applicable

6

Reason(s) for the matter being dealt with if urgent

6.1

Not applicable

Approved by:

..........................

Date of decision:

.........................

EMP&R0702B

Councillor T K Thornber

Hampshire County Council

Executive Member, Policy and Resources

11 July 2002

Trading Standards National Performance Framework

Report by the Director of Property, Business and Regulatory Services

Contact: Tony Langstone Ext: 6619

1 Background

1.1 Following pilots in a number of authorities, including Hampshire, the Department of Trade and Industry has launched a National Performance Framework (NPF) for Trading Standards Services. The Framework has been introduced to address the inconsistencies in the service nationally, highlighted by the Audit Commission in its report `Measure for Measure' (December 1999). The Government's stated key aim is to improve the service provided to consumers and business. It is also a reaction to concerns that the Food Standards Agency has biased resources towards food enforcement, to the detriment of other areas.

1.2 The NPF is intended to:

1.3 The NPF has no legal backing at this stage, although it is suggested that this

1.4 The Service Delivery Plan falls into three parts:

1.5 The standards are aspirations rather than prescriptive and at this stage there are no performance targets, although these will be developed in the light of experience. Services can incorporate their own local standards. The overall intention is that the NPF will ensure delivery of the Government's national priorities for the service i.e.

1.6 The NPF seeks to achieve continuous improvement and the Best Value process will be an important means of accomplishing this. The service reports performance against Best Value Performance Indicator (BVPI) 166. The DTI plans to consult in 2002 on bringing BVPI 166 into line with the NPF.

1.7 The Performance Information Return will provide baseline data and is said to be experimental. Although this is not a legal requirement the return will incorporate the statutory annual return under Section 70 of the Weights and Measures Act. This has been greatly simplified. The first return will be required to be submitted for 2002/03 by 30 June next year. Results are likely to be published in league tables.

2. Member Approval and Presentation

2.1 A copy of the National Performance Framework for the County Council's Trading Standards Service is attached at Appendix 1.

2.2 The DTI requires the plan to be approved by the appropriate member forum

3. Summary

3.1 The service has produced comprehensive Service Plans for some years and

Section 100D - Local Government Act 1972 - Background Papers:

The following documents disclose facts or matters on which this report, or an important part of it, is based and has been relied upon to a material extent in the preparation of this report.

NB the list excludes:

1. Published works.

2. Documents which disclose exempt or confidential information as defined in the Act.

File Location

None.

APPENDIX 1

National Performance Framework

for

Hampshire County Council Trading Standards Service

Part One: Context and Comparative Factors

A Trading Standards and the Community

1 Introduction

1.1 Hampshire County Council is the third largest shire county with a population of 1.25 million. Its economy is estimated at £16.3 bn, which makes it the second largest shire economy in the country behind only Surrey. The county is predominantly rural, with 87% of the population living in the 10% of the county classified as urban, mainly in the northeast and along the M3 and M27 corridors. Hampshire is generally affluent with higher than national average earnings and low unemployment levels. However, there are pockets of deprivation with a number of wards falling within the worst 20% of deprived areas nationally. The port cities of Portsmouth and Southampton, which became unitary authorities at local government re-organisation in 19997, also have a important effect on the local economy. Significant rural areas are subject to national and international environmental designations, including the proposed new National Parks for the New Forest and South Downs. These and the extensive coastline together with the historic city of Winchester, the ancient capital of England, make Hampshire a popular destination for tourists.

1.2 At local government re-organisation the opportunity was taken to form Regulatory Services by combining the Trading Standards Service with the authority's Science Services (Public Analyst), and the Registration and Coroners Services (together with the Rent Service until it became an agency). Regulatory Services is part of a larger Department known as Property, Business and Regulatory Services. The core responsibilities of the Service are shown on the attached form as Appendix 1.

2 Community and Corporate Objectives

2.1 Service planning has been an integral part of Trading Standards management for many years and maps onto Corporate and Community objectives. The main aims of the Service and their linkages to Corporate and Community aims are shown in Figure 1.

Hampshire County Council Corporate Strategy

1. Developing the quality of life in Hampshire 3. Achieving Economic Prosperity

2. Stewardship of the Environment 4. Partnership for strong communities in Hampshire

Regulatory Services' Vision

To provide highly valued services with maximum impact that best protects and supports the public and businesses of Hampshire

2.2 The aim of the restructure was to further improve performance by focusing resources on key areas and clarifying responsibilities and management accountability. It was also expected to help in meeting corporate and community expectations by providing a more customer orientated service. The need to respond to the challenge of the Food Standards Agency had already led to the formation of an embryo food team, and this was expanded and combined with Animal Health and Welfare to cover food from plough to plate. Streamlining responsibilities enables staff to concentrate on specific legislation and business sectors, which is considered more efficient and effective than endeavouring to cope with the full range of Trading Standards law. The restructure was also intended to meet anticipated demands from the DTI and the OFT and the issues raised in the Audit Commission report `Measure for Measure'. Two new posts were also created from existing resources, one to concentrate on Business Support and the other on Community Safety Projects.

2.3 Each functional team produces its own annual Service Plan, which also includes anticipated and planned developments over a three-year period. An umbrella Service Plan for Regulatory Services as a whole is also produced. Community and Corporate Objectives and their linkage to Trading Standards

3 Aims, Objectives, Strategic Thinking

3.1 Aims, objectives and strategic thinking are covered in detail in the main Regulatory Service Plan and the functional team Service Plans referred to in Section 2 above. In summary they are as follows:

B Local Structure and Resources

4 Local Authority Organisation, accountability and wider links

4.1 The County Council is made up of nine main departments and the Corporate Management Team is comprised of the Chief Executive and the eight Chief Officers of the departments. The County Council has adopted a Cabinet with Leader structure, the nine members each having a portfolio covering a major service area. The Leader has the portfolio for the Property, Business and Regulatory Services Department, which includes Trading Standards. The organisational structure of the Trading Standards Service and how it fits into the Corporate Structure is shown in Section 3 of the Regulatory Services Service Plan (page 7).

4.2 Partnerships

Activity

Description

Partners

Citizenship Education Package

Educating Key Stage 3 and 4 school children in consumer rights and responsibilities

Education Department and local teachers

Junior Citizen

Educating Key Stage 2 school children in on age-restricted products; food and product safety

Education Dept and Multi-agency

Young Consumer of the Year Competition (YCOY)

Educating Key Stage 4 school children in consumer law

Education Dept and Hampshire schools

YCOY

Regional Co-ordinator

Regional Trading Standards authorities

Sale of Personal Computers

Compliance with Electro-mag. Regs

Contract with DTI

Sale of boats

Compliance with Recreational Craft Regs

Joint contract with DTI and S'oton City Council

Child Car Seats

Ensuring correct fitting and use of child car seats

Britax; HCC Road Safety Unit; Child Accident Prevention Trust

Electric Blanket

Free tests on electric blankets to reduce accidents and fires

Fire & Rescue Service

District Councils Argos

Age Concern

Responsible Tobacconist Award Scheme

Control cigarette sales to under-age children by linking law & health and promoting best practice

Health Promotion Service and District Councils

Under-age sale of alcohol

Control under-age purchasing of alcohol

Hampshire Constabulary

Petrol leakages

Protect water sources from pollution

Environment Agency

Doorstep sales

Protecting the vulnerable from scams and distraction burglary

Hampshire Constabulary and Neighbourhood Watch

Good Trader Scheme (Buy with Confidence)

Promote compliance with TS law and sign-post consumers to reliable traders

Business Link

Hampshire Businesses

Referenceline

Buy with Confidence

Home improvements and repairs (as above)

Age Concern

Consumer Advice

Linking advice agencies

Consumer Support Network

Animal Health & Welfare

Enforcing laws on health and welfare

DEFRA

RSPCA

Horse-Watch

Joint working to reduce crime related to horses and equipment

Hampshire Constabulary farmers and horse owners

Animal Health

Compliance with animal health legislation

Contract with S'oton City Council to carry out work in city

Social exclusion in Havant

Community out-reach work in deprived area to advise on consumer rights etc

Havant District Council

Community Safety

Doorstep scams

District Council Community Safety Services & Age Concern

Direct Farm Sales

Training for farmers

Business Link & District Council

Promote locally produced products

Origin approved scheme to promote Hampshire foods and craft products

Hampshire Fayre

Overloaded vehicles

Protocol to inspect weighbridges and provide statements of accuracy

Hampshire Constabulary

Metrology Services

Weighbridge and bulk fuel inspections

Contracts with S'oton and Portsmouth City Councils

4.3 Hampshire Trading Standards Service takes part in the following forums for the exchange of information and best practice etc.

4.4 The Trading Standards Service is a member of Basingstoke and Deane and North Hampshire Local Business Partnerships and regularly contributes to their newsletters, which reach over 7,000 businesses. The Service was also instrumental in the establishment of Farmers Markets in the county and Hampshire Fare, an origin accreditation scheme for local food and products. It continues to support both these initiatives.

5 Local Authority Trading Standards Expenditure

5.1 The annual budget for the Service is shown on the attached profile form as Appendix 2.

5 Staffing Allocation

6.1 Staffing is shown on the attached profile form Appendix 2.

6 Accessibility

6.1 The following provides a summary of service provision and accessibility. Further details are provided in the Service Plans.

C Assessment of Community Expectations and Feedback

8 Needs and expectations of consumers

8.1 Community expectation is assessed by a number of methods:

8.2 Demand for the Consumer Advice Service and Trading Standards Service enforcement advice and investigation has continued to grow. Although this is a non-statutory function the Service has endeavoured to meet this need by maintaining a core team of well trained, dedicated Advisory Officers. The work with the CSN will inform this area of the service as it is developed. The service deals with about 17,000 enquiries p.a. and there is an increasing demand to reach out and identify with local communities. The top three areas of complaint are:

8.3 The majority of consumer complaints that are dealt with by enforcement staff related to fair trading issues. The Service expects to deal with over 2,000 enquiries in the current year. The majority of investigations and prosecutions usually fall to the Fair Trading team as enquiries relate to the wilfully non-compliant. Many complaints relate to second-hand cars and servicing; home improvements and repairs and misleading prices.

8.4 The service deals with approximately 400 consumer complaints p.a. relating to product safety and under-age sales, showing this to be a key area of public concern. In addition it is estimated that 320 complaints will be received in respect of food composition and labelling. Animal welfare is another area of public concern and a number of pressure groups are particularly vocal, which makes this a priority area of work.

9 Needs and expectations of local business

9.1 The Service aims to ensure a high level of compliance with Trading Standards legislation at the same time as supporting the Corporate Aim of Achieving Economic Prosperity. Our assessment of need is therefore based on advising and working with businesses, with progressive action for non-compliance. Business need and expectation is based on inspection and sampling results; enquiries and complaints from and about businesses; Hampshire Planning & Research Profile and Corporate and Government priorities. Direct consultation with businesses is due to take place in the summer of 2002 as part of Best Value. Business demand is dealt with in greater detail in the Service Plans attached and is summarised in the sections below.

9.2 Based on our assessment there is a need to meet demand for advice from Hampshire businesses and the Home Authority Principle is a core element of the service.. This is built into the Service Plans as specific projects and an appropriate number of officer days allocated. The assessment shows a need for:

9.3 Demand for metrology verifications and work related to new and re-developed petroleum storage sites continues to be heavy. Home authority requests for advice is strong in the fields of food labelling and composition; product safety and fair trading. A number of companies require officers with specialist knowledge e.g.

9.4 The Hampshire Planning and Research Profile shows the county to be close to the national average for large firms with over 100 employees. There are 31 businesses per head of population, slightly above the national average of 28. A high proportion of employees are in high technology, `knowledge based' industries, with twice the percentage of manufacturing employment than nationally. However, Hampshire is below the national average for knowledge based services. Taken together Hampshire is just above the national average. Further details are shown in the profile form - Appendix 2.

10 Local awareness of Trading Standards

10.1 A MORI survey of Hampshire's Citizens' Panel in 2001 showed that consumer awareness of the Trading Standards Advice Service is quite low at 41%. Groups significantly less likely to be aware of the service include:

10.2 Only 12% of residents had used the advice service - none aged 16-24. It must be pointed out that this survey was in relation to the Advice Service only rather than Trading Standards as a whole. This compares with the DTI Consumer Knowledge Survey 2000, which showed that 90% of people had heard of the CAB and 49% had used it. The DTI survey also showed that 73% of people knew of Trading Standards and 40% had used the service.

10.3 A small survey of advice service users was carried out in 2000 and a revised questionnaire piloted in 2001. The findings have been analysed with a view to carrying out a larger, regular survey of users. Further consultation, including non-users, is also being conducted in summer 2002 as part of Best Value. Awareness of the service is being promoted through press releases and articles in the County Council's residents' magazine, `Hampshire Now', which is sent to all households in the county at least three times a year.

10.4 Consultation with business is due to take place during 2002 as part of Best Value and relevant data is not currently available. Judging from demands made on the service by businesses it is generally well known. Awareness is believed to be particularly high at food premises and among farmers due to an extensive food inspection and sampling programme and foot and mouth licensing respectively. Among businesses targeted by the service or affected by licensing e.g. product safety premises and petroleum sites, awareness is again expected to be reasonably high. Knowledge of the service across the car trade is known to be high from inspection and investigation activities. Press releases; articles in LBP and Federation of Small Businesses newsletters and trade seminars aim to increase awareness of the service.

11 Demand for specialist services

11.1 The Weighbridge Test Unit is hired out to other authorities and commercial operators for approximately three quarters of the year. Demand from commercial users has grown steadily since new insurance arrangements released it for use by private companies two years ago. However, this has been balanced by reducing demand from local authorities. Including inspection and verification within Hampshire the Unit is in use throughout the year. The high level of weighbridges found to be incorrect on inspection in Hampshire (21%) makes this a priority area of metrology work.

11.2 The Bulk Fuel Unit is used by Southampton and Portsmouth Unitary authorities for six days a year and occasionally by the Isle of Wight. The use by other authorities declined to zero in 2001. Use of the unit within Hampshire is a priority metrology area due to past experience of fraud in this trade; lack of controls and checks available to consumers and relatively high failures found on inspection (13%).

11.3 Approved Body Status (NAWI). 64 scales were tested in 200/-1, the highest in the SETSA region. Demand reduced to 19 in 2001/02, again the highest in the region. Hampshire is leading a review of approved body status for SETSA with a view to rationalising provision across the region.

11.4 Last year was particularly difficult year due to the foot and mouth outbreak.

Part 2: National and Local Priorities

D Policies on National and Local Priorities

12 Informed Confident Consumers

12.1 All work, including reactive, is estimated from previous experience and allocated a project number and staff and financial resources. There is a heavy claim on officer time from consumer complaints, particularly on fair trading




and safety. Due to the demand on resources the Service is gradually moving towards an intelligence led approach to enforcement. Complaints from the public are risk assessed and those of a minor nature are only recorded for information and taken into account in future service planning. A close watch is kept on the top ten `problem' companies and projects are planned for known problem areas e.g. second-hand cars, which is regularly the top trade sector for consumer complaints.

12.3 Inspection is a another key element of the service to ensure high standards of compliance. The service expects to visit all high risk and half of medium risk premises during the year. The service also maintains a high level of food and product safety sampling as part of annual programme of work. The former is not only to meet Food Standards Agency requirements but also the general public concern over food safety, composition and labelling.

12.4 Under-age sales are considered to be a high priority area of work due to Government targets on health e.g. reducing the level of smoking; reducing accidents (solvent deaths). Such priorities are reflected in local concerns, particularly relating to alcohol, which links to other aims related to youth; crime and disorder; and educational attainments. The service plans to work closely with the police to enforce the new, shared duty in respect of the Licensing Act.

12.5 The Service Plans give details of planned projects, which cover all the work carried out by the service, targets and the resources allocated. Each project has a project leader who produces a project protocol setting out the links to Corporate Aims; methods to be adopted; details of premises to be visited and/or samples to be taken; performance indicators and anticipated outcome.

12.6 Full details and links to Corporate objectives are shown in the attached
Service Plans. Appendix 3 shows the full list of planned work in the form of
projects.




The following is a summary of planned service provision.

13 Informed Successful Businesses

13.1 Full details and links to Corporate Objectives are shown in the various Service Plans. The following is a summary of planned service provision. A full list of projects covering all areas of work is shown in Appendix 3.

14 Enforcement of a Fair and Safe Trading Environment

14.1 Principles of good enforcement

14.2 Home Authority Principle

14.3 Programme of enforcement activity

14.4 Enforcement arrangements for e-business and e-commerce

14.5 Targeting problem traders and business sectors

14.6 Tackling practices which target vulnerable and socially excluded

14.7 Arrangements with regional co-ordinators

14.8 Metrology inspection and verification

E Efficient, Effective and Improving Trading Standards Service

15 Efficient, effective and improving Trading Standards Service

15.1 As stated in Section 2.1 the Service was reviewed and re-structured in October 2001 in order to meet stakeholder needs more effectively and efficiently. The benefits and any disadvantages of the new arrangements will be reviewed in September 2002. So far staff reaction has been very positive. During the spring and summer of 2002 the Service will conduct a Best Value review, which will include extensive consultation with the public and business. It will also hold a Challenge event by inviting key stakeholders to give their views on the Service and its priorities and how the service is delivered. Members are obviously an integral part of the review and are invited to attend all Best Value meetings and the two sub-groups dealing with Consultation and Comparison. Best Value will be the prime vehicle for improving the Service and a final report to the County Council is planned for October 2002. In addition where reviews of the Service Plan and projects identify areas for improvement or development these will be implemented as appropriate. Staff are encouraged to present ideas for improvement via a `Brainwave' suggestion scheme, the Performance Development Review process and staff meetings.

Provisions for developing and modernising the service

Relates to relevant feedback

Links with other partnerships

Links with Best Value Review

Consultation with stakeholders

Insufficient evidence of stakeholder needs

DTI DEFRA SETSA LBPs

Police LACORS

F&RS CSN

Yes

Comparison with Best Practice and similar sized TS authorities

Inadequate analysis of information and details of best practice

As above

Yes

Challenge Workshop

No available feedback

As above

Yes

Compete with alternative service providers

No evidence currently available

 

Yes

Quality Audits

Feedback from previous audits and Quality Review

 

Yes

Develop website

Increasing hits on website and e-mail contacts

CSN SETSA

LBPs

Yes

Develop communications to ensure information accessible and in Plain English

Feedback from MORI surveys

 

Yes

Maintenance and Calibration

Feedback from ISO 9000 audit

Unitary Authorities

 

Health & Safety at work

Internal Audits

 

Yes

Part 3 Review, Assessment and Improvement

16 Quality Assessment and Review

16.1 Provisions for ensuring the work of the service is assessed against the Service
Plan and ISO Standard include the following:

Current Awards

Benchmarking and Peer Assessment

Performance against Service Plan

16.2 Identification of Variation from Plan

16.3 Areas for Improvement

Name of Authority

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

Name of Chief Inspector of Weights and Measures

ANTONY E LANGSTONE

Status of Plan

(yes or no?)

    · Approved by Members

    · Member Approval pending

    (notify monitoring unit when approval obtained)

Enforcement

Responsibility

Description

Is this in your remit?

(yes or no?)

Weights and Measures

    Work relating to the accuracy of weighing and measuring equipment in use for trade and ensuring quantity of goods is within tolerance. Verification services.

    YES

    · Does your authority maintain local standards?

    (Ref: Section 4 Weights and Measures Act 1985)

    NO

    · Does your service hold Approved Body status?

    (Relates to the Non Automatic Weighing Instruments Directive and linked UK Regulations)

    YES

Fair Trading

    Includes claims about prices, quality or description of goods and services.

    YES

Product Safety

    Includes monitoring goods supplied to consumers are safe and correctly labelled.

    YES

Food Standards

    Includes ensuring food is correctly described and labelled throughout the supply chain, and that applicable compositional standards are met.

    YES

    · Is this function shared with environmental health?

    NO

Consumer Credit

    Includes monitoring licensing regime, ensuing transactions, documentation and adverts comply.

    YES

Animal Health and Welfare

    Includes movement licences, monitoring welfare during transport and at markets

    YES

Agricultural Standards

    Includes ensuring fertilisers and animal feeding stuffs are of correct composition and labelled.

    YES

Age Restricted Sales

    Ensuring certain products are not supplied to children, e.g. tobacco, videos, butane lighter fuel fireworks.

    YES

Road Traffic

    Includes supply of unroadworthy vehicles, overloaded goods vehicles, weight restriction areas.

    YES

Explosives

    Ensuring fireworks and other explosives are safely stored on registered premises.

    YES

Petroleum

    Ensuring petroleum is safely stored on licensed premises.

    YES

Environmental Legislation

    Includes energy labelling, packaging disposal and motor fuel pollutants.

    YES

Licensing

    List only the main duties:

    Petroleum

    Explosives

    Poisons

(Nurses Agencies)

Additional Functions. List any additional main duties which fall to your service

(Do not include membership of enforcement forums and business partnerships as these fall into section 4 of the plan)

Specialist Services. List only the main services below (include services such as calibration services, public analyst and product testing, note any partners)

    Partners

    Regulatory Services includes the Trading Standards Service and Public Analyst service

    Weighbridge Test Unit

    Bulk Fuel Unit

    EC Notified Body

    Public Analyst Partnered with Kent County Council

    Advice

Responsibility

      Description

Is this in your remit?

(yes or no?)

    Are you part of a Consumer Support Network?

    YES

Business Advice

    Provision of advice to business through means other than inspection and home authority.

    YES

Consumer Advice

    Provision of advice & information to consumers.

    YES

    Indicate the level of consumer advice you provide. (mark Y for yes where appropriate)

    (In terms of the Community Legal Services Quality Mark definitions)

    Client

Level

Local tax payers

Contract in area

    No local connection

Information

    YES

    YES

    YES

Assisted information

    YES

    YES

    NO

General Help

    YES

    YES

    NO

General help plus case work

    NO

    NO

    NO

     

Information: The advice service must typically be able to supply information such as leaflets and other reference material relevant to trading standards

Assisted information: As well as offering information such as leaflets and other reference material will also provide someone to help find the information needed or to help decide on the most appropriate source of help

General Help: The advice service must typically be able to offer information and advice to consumers to help resolve the problem. The service will diagnose the problem, explain the options available to rectify the problem, identify further action and give basic assistance such as assisting in form filling, letter writing and by contacting other organisations for further information.

General help plus case work: As above but will take action on behalf of the consumer and puts their case to the other party in order to persuade them to make or change a decision in favour of the consumer. This might include negotiating by telephone, by letter or face to face. The service may provide advocacy in formal proceedings such as the Small Claims Procedure

Your council/business tax payers: Residents, local businesses, organisations based in the area

Contracts arising in your area: Complainant/enquirer may not be based in the area, but the goods or services causing concern were obtained in the area

All contacts helped: Advice is given regardless of origin

Appendix 2


COMMUNITY TRADING STANDARDS SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN

PROFILE FORM

Name of Authority

Hampshire County Council

Area in Hectares

369,032

Local Authority Organisation

In what year will/was the Trading Standards service part of a Best Value review by your authority?

2002/2003

Indicate if you have received, or are working towards, any of the following:

Received

Working towards

    · Charter Mark

    · Investors in People

_

    · OFT excellence award (scheme under review)

_

    · Beacon Status (what topic)

    · CLS Quality Mark

_

    · ISO 9000

_

Do you use the EFQM ® model? (yes or no?)

YES

Do you have a service level agreement with the Office of Fair Trading? (Yes or no?)

NO

Others: (list below)

Brief description

Anti-counterfeiting Group Award

Awards to authority and also senior officer for

commitment to anti-counterfeit work.

DTI

Specific Contract to check compliance with

Recreational Craft Directive and Electro magnetic

compatibility Regs.

Please note that costs and expenditure have not been completed in this example because it is fictional and DTI does not want to suggest that there is an optimum resource level for this plan. Local Authority Expenditure

Column 1: where available give actual expenditure for last financial year, where figures are not yet available state estimated expenditure and send fully completed form to DTI when figures are confirmed.

Column 2: give details of your budget allocation.

1

Gross Expenditure

(or forecast spend)

2001/2002

2

Budget allocated for

coming year

2002/2003

EMPLOYEE COSTS

Include: basic pay, overtime, employer's superannuation, employer's national insurance SSP due, pay arrears, other allowances/payments, car allowances/mileage/leases/travel expenses and fares, subsistence, pension increases and other employee costs.

NB

Projected out-turn not actual

2,181,100

2,249,700

PROPERTY COSTS

800

700

SUPPLIES AND SERVICES

Include: computer equipment (purchase/rental/maintenance), furniture, equipment and other tools including protective clothing, publications, journals, newspapers and other supplies and services.

140,600

141,300

SAMPLING COSTS

Include: purchases made for the purposes of sampling/testing.

424,100

423,700

TRANSPORT AND PLANT

Include: hire of external vehicles

85,400

85,300

ADMINISTRATION

Include: Printing and stationery, telephones, advertising (recruitment), postages/couriers, insurance, medical costs, petty outlays, hospitality and other administration costs

46,700

46,800

TRAINING AND CONFERENCES

Include: training, conferences, membership fees/subscriptions and exam fees.

31,600

31,600

PAYMENT TO OTHER BODIES

For example, public analyst, test unit, cross-boundary projects

-

-

PAYMENT TO CONTRACTORS

-

-

TRANSFER PAYMENTS

-

-

FINANCING CHARGES

Include: central support costs

294,800

300,900

GROSS COSTS (total of all above costs)

3,205,100

3,280,000

INCOME

212,800

204,900

Please note expenditure heads are based on CIPFA expenditure heads.

From Audit Scotland's Self Assessment Guide

FUNDING FOR LOCAL BUSINESS

PARTNERSHIPS

-

-

Staffing Allocation

(Numbers to be expressed as full time equivalents to one decimal point as employed at the start of the financial year. Where staff are shared with other services or have mixed roles include the hours spent on Trading Standards roles to full time equivalents. Examples of mixed roles might be enforcement staff acting as consumer advisers on a regular duty rota or DTS trainees who additionally have an enforcement role.

 

Role

Description

Number of staff

Managerial

Staff primarily concerned with the management of staff within Trading Standards. Include only the proportion of time spent on such duties.

4.5

Administration

Staff that support the service within the office

8.2

Enforcement staff

Staff such as Trading Standards Officers and Consumer Protection Officers authorised under criminal legislation

39

Enforcement support staff

Staff not authorised under criminal legislation but who support that aspect of the service, for example laboratory staff, technical assistants

9

Consumer advice

Include both full time staff dedicated to providing advice to consumers and the proportion of time other staff spend on such duties.

8.6

DTS Trainees

From degree or APEL routes

1

Total Number of Staff

Exclude vacant posts

70.3

Current vacancies

All roles

1

Long term vacancies

Note number of vacancies of more than 4 months duration

 
     

Qualification

Description

 

DTS

Diploma in Trading Standards or equivalent

25

DCA

Full Diploma in Consumer Affairs

20

DCA Food paper

Full Diploma in Consumer Affairs with Food qualification

8

DCA Animal Health

Full Diploma in Consumer Affairs with Animal Health qualification

4

DMS & similar

Diploma in Management Studies

13

Others:

List other relevant qualifications

(include PC training for example ECDL, single DCA papers)

30

     
     
     

Business Profile

   
     
 

Description

Number

Businesses registered for business rates

This brings consistency to statistics between authorities. Give most recent figures.

33,011

Home Authority Firms: formal agreements

Following LACOTS Home Authority principle guidance. Give estimate at end March 2002.

 

Home Authority Firms: informal recognition

Number of traders you recognised as being based in your area and about which you will take enquiries. Give estimate for end March 2002.

704

Enquiries received concerning your Home Authority firms.

Include figures from other enforcement agencies. Exclude consumer complaints and enquiries and requests for business advice. Give estimate for end March 2002.

620

Risk Assessment: assessment of risk a business poses to consumers and competitors to determine frequency of inspection visits and appropriate enforcement

High

Follow LACOTS guidance on premises risk assessment (revised and issued early 2002). Give figures from your database for year end for the number of businesses based, or with physical premises, in your local authority area. This can include internet sites where the supplier is based in your area, stalls and other mobile traders as well as fixed premises.

885

Medium

7071

Low

14,652

No inspectable risk

11,528

   

TOTAL

34,136

Other Business Data

   
 
 

Description

Number

Business start ups

Use figures based in VAT registrations. Give figures for end March 2002. Latest figures are for 2000

4,320

Business failures

3,740

     

Appendix 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAIR TRADING

 

 

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2T1A

Reactive work - Public

AJS

1000

800

200

1000

2T1B

Reactive work - Businesses

AJS

600

500

100

600

2T2A

Prosecutions & investigations

AJS

530

430

100

530

2T3A

Monitor licence renewals

AJS

15

15

15

2T3B

Nurses agencies

JRL

30

30

30

2T3C

Blackbushe Market

MD

85

35

50

85

2A3

Consumer Education

JF

35

35

35

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

2130

165

1845

450

2295

 

 

 

FOOD

 

 

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2F1

Reactive/Prosec/Inv work

NAS

520

500

20

520

2F2

High risk inspections

NW

303

243

60

303

2F3

Medium risk inspections

NW

530

470

60

530

2F4

Low risk inspections

NW

70

10

60

70

2F5

Agriculture Inspections

RS

50

50

50

2F6

Other agriculture

RS

60

60

60

2F7

Special projects

NW

40

40

40

2A3

Consumer Education

JF

35

35

35

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

1568

40

1408

200

1608

 

 

 

METROLOGY

 

 

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2M1

Reactive/Prosec/Inv work

PJT

50

40

10

50

2M3

Verification

RIC

285

195

90

285

2M4

Standards

RIC

20

10

10

20

2M5

Weighbridge & Heavies

RIC

60

50

10

60

2M6

RTA Protocols

RIC

20

10

10

20

2M7

Met Packers (non-food)

MW

120

40

80

120

2M8

Bulk Fuel

RIC

55

25

30

55

2M10

Pump inspection

RIC

90

50

40

90

2M11

WBTU (Non Hants)

RIC

120

120

120

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

675

145

420

400

820

 

 

 

PRODUCT SAFETY

 

 

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2P1

Reactive/Prosec/Inv work

PJT

440

400

40

440

2P3

High risk inspections

RHK

85

70

15

85

2P4

Medium risk inspections

RHK

123

95

28

123

2P6

Underage sales

KBM

150

100

50

150

2P7

Child Car seats

RHK

16

11

5

16

2P8

Tobacconist Award Scheme

KBM

70

60

10

70

2P9

Safety sampling projects

RHK

115

90

25

115

2P11

Electric blankets

KBM

55

35

20

55

2P12

ERTS

DWB

90

50

40

90

2P14

Recreational craft

NR

15

15

15

2A3

Consumer Education

JF

17

12

5

17

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

648

528

938

238

1176

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY

 

 

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2E1

Reactive/Prosec/Inv work

PJT

400

400

0

400

2E3

Petrol Licence Inspection

DS

80

70

10

80

2E4

Explosive & Firework storage

MW

32

32

0

32

2E6

Packaging regs

DWB

10

10

0

10

2E7

Fuel pollution

DS

5

5

5

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

480

47

517

10

527

 

 

 

ADVICE

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO/AO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2A1A

Enquiries & Complaints

JE

1200

1200

1200

2A1B

Presentations & talks

JE

15

15

15

2A1C

Publications

JE

10

10

10

2A1D

Develop Hantsnet/www

AS

100

100

100

2A1E

Develop CLS & CSN

JW

20

20

20

2A1F

Stop Now orders

JW

30

30

30

2A2A

Think Twice Booklet

JF

20

20

20

2A2B

Neighbourhood watch

JF

30

30

30

2A2C

Police links

JF

10

10

10

2A2D

Community Initiatives - Las

JF

20

20

20

2A2E

Community & CSN

JF

30

30

30

2A3A

Lifesmart YCOY

JF

30

30

30

2A3B

Junior Citizen

JF

50

50

50

2A3C

Citizenship

JF

30

30

30

2A3D

Safety magazine for Schools

JF

10

10

10

2A4A

LBP

JW

10

10

10

2A4B

BSP

PP

200

200

200

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

1485

330

1815

0

1815

 

ANIMAL HEALTH

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO (AH)

TO

TOTAL

 

2H1

Reactive/Prosec/Inv work

NAS

300

300

300

2H3

Targeted Inspections

NAS

100

100

100

2H4

Special Projects

CA

20

20

20

2H5

Other (Pony sales, Horse F, Police)

NAS

30

30

30

2H6

Foot & Mouth Licensing

NAS

75

75

75

 

 

 

 

525

0

525

0

525

 

 

 

DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

 

Project no

Project

P.L.

CORE

SPECIAL

TSO

TO

TOTAL

 

 

2D1

Best value meetings

REA

36

0

36

0

36

2D2

Health & Safety Activities

JF

20

0

20

0

20

2D3

Quality Audits

REA

130

0

130

0

130

2D4

Maintenance & calibration

REA

24

0

24

0

24

2D5

Communications

AEL

35

0

35

0

35

2D6

Information technology

JF

35

0

35

0

35

2D7

Personnel & PDR interviews

JF

60

0

60

0

60

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

340

0

340

0

340

 

 

 

GRAND TOTALS (Days)

 

7851

1255

7808

1298

9106

 

% of TOTAL

 

86

14

86

14

100

 

 

 

Available days

10032

1980

12012

 

Available FTE's

45.6

9

54.6

 

 

 

% ALLOCATION

 

 

 

78

66

76

EMP&R0702B