Hampshire County Council

Children and Young People Select Committee

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Report of the Review Group

12 March 2009

Contents

Foreword 4

Commonly used acronyms 6

Executive Summary 8

1. Introduction 21

2. Findings of the review: 23

3. Profile of the workforce: 35

4. Recruitment to subject areas 39

5. Summary: how successful is Hampshire in recruiting and retaining

teachers and headteachers when compared to the national picture? 44

6. The story behind the data - an introduction to recruitment

and retention for schools

7. The story behind the data - so what's the problem? 46

8. The story behind the data - the changing nature of school

management: 54

9. The story behind the data - the role of Governing Bodies 58

10. The story behind the data - the impact of Initial Teacher Training

and the Newly Qualified Teacher year 60

11. What is being done to tackle recruitment and retention in

Hampshire? 64

12. Specific issues for special schools 71

13. Conclusions & Recommendations 74

14. List of Recommendations 85

Annexe A: Primary, Secondary and Special Schools: Full time equivalent number

Annexe B: Full time vacancy numbers and rates in local authority maintained

Annexe C: Hampshire teaching vacancies: adverts placed on Hantsweb - total per district by academic year 99

Annexe D: Full time classroom teacher vacancy rates in local authority

Annexe E: Full time vacancy rates in local authority maintained schools by grade 105

Annexe F: Hampshire teacher vacancies: secondary core and non-core subjects

Annexe G: Hampshire 2007/8 Newly Qualified Teachers leaving profession 111

References 115

For further information about this report, please contact:

Emma Gordon, Scrutiny Officer

Tel: 01962 847567

emma.gordon@hants.gov.uk

Hampshire County Council

Children and Young People Select Committee

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Report of the Review Group

12 March 2009

Foreword by Cllr Keith Evans

Chairman, Recruitment & Retention Review Group

The rationale for this review was not as a reaction to particular identified problems in Hampshire's education provision. It was borne out of some main threads of discussion and awareness:

The review group were very aware that the County Council has no absolute rights in the area of teacher and headteacher recruitment and retention. Members therefore examined the areas presented as objectively as possible. The recommendations are presented in the considered context of a consistent approach to the recruitment and career development of teachers to give Hampshire a planned succession of good headteachers.

The review group tackled the task by gathering and reviewing background, statistical and numerical data, inviting written evidence from key players in the education community and by taking oral evidence from a selected group of witnesses. The group also visited one of Hampshire's special schools - Shepherd's Down in Compton - which provided an excellent insight into some of the specific issues special schools face in recruiting and retaining a high quality staff.

The quality of education received by pupils and the ethos of the schools they attend are inextricably linked and are critical factors in the overall wellbeing of the individuals and for the communities in which they reside. Attracting, developing and retaining a quality workforce for Hampshire schools is therefore a priority for Members.

Education is a subject of interest to all Members and provokes strong views. In conducting this review, I was fortunate to count amongst my review group colleagues some Members with teaching and school support experience as well as governors and parents. This was invaluable and I would wish to thank them for their stamina and diligence in reading the high volumes of material we received and for the very positive and probing way in which they have contributed to the questioning and debate of the evidence.

The data and statistics we received support the conclusion that Hampshire has not had any particular overall problems in recruiting and retaining teachers in comparison with other neighbouring authorities.

There are factors, however, that do make recruitment and retention more difficult in some areas of the County:

These aspects are covered in the conclusions and recommendations.

Given the unquestioned importance of a good headteacher, the procedures for recruiting and developing teachers and for supporting newly appointed headteachers are very important. The roles of governors and the school improvement partner (SIP) are essential parts of this process. The County has a good support structure with some excellent facilities for leadership development and governor training. The conclusions and recommendations touch on this area and on the overall role of the County's education support.

Finally, and on behalf of the panel, I would like to thank the scrutiny officers for their work in researching the topics and reporting on the debate and the oral evidence sessions. All of this helped the panel focus on the review objective and not wander into the vast and complex world of education in general.

Keith D Evans

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Report of the Review Group

Glossary of acronyms

AST- Advanced Skills Teacher

BaT - Becoming a Teacher (project)

BESD - Behavioural Emotional Social Difficulty

BME - Black and Minority Ethnic

CEO - Chief Education Officer

CfBT - an Education Trust which is a leading not-for-profit organisation that has been providing education for the public benefit for over 40 years, both in the UK and internationally.

CPD - Continuing Professional Development

CTC - City Technology College

CWDC -Children's Workforce Development Council

CWN - Children's Workforce Network

DCSF - Department for Children, Schools and Families

DfES - Department for Education and Skills

DHT - Deputy Headteacher

EBR - Employment Based Routes

ECM - Every Child Matters

EPD - Early Professional Development

EPS- Education Personnel Services

ETS - Excellent Teacher Status

EYPS - Early Years Professional Status

FTE - Full Time Equivalent

GO - Government Office

GTC - General Teaching Council

GTP - Graduate Training Programme

GTRP - Graduate and Registered Teacher Programme

HE - Higher Education

HEI - Higher Education Institution

HIAS - Hampshire Inspection and Advisory Service

HLDC - Hampshire Learning and Development Centre

HLTA - Higher Level Teaching Assistant

HoD - Head of Department

HoY - Head of Year

HTLC - Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College

IDP- Inclusion Development Programme

ITT - Initial Teacher Training

LA - Local Authority

LAA - Local Area Agreement

LAWTM - Local Authority Workforce Team Member

LDC - Leadership Development Centre

LEA - Local Education Authority

LPSH - Leadership Programme for Serving Headteachers (from the NCSL)

LSA - Learning Support Assistant

MA - Master of Arts

MBA - Masters in Business Administration

MDC - Middle Leaders Development Centre

MEC - Mathematics Experience Course

MLD - Multiple Learning Difficulties

MTL - Masters in Teaching and Learning

NAHT - National Association of Headteachers

NASUWT - National Association of Schoolmasters/Union of Women Teachers

NCSL - National College for School Leadership

NDPB - Non-departmental Public Body

NFER - National Foundation for Educational Research

NLE - National Leaders in Education

NOS - National Occupational Standards

NPQH - National Professional Qualification for Headship

NPQICL - National Professional Qualification In Integrated Centred Leadership

NQT - Newly Qualified Teacher

OECD - Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

OFSTED - Office for Standards in Education

PGCE - Postgraduate Certificate in Education

PISA - Programme for International Student Assessment

PM - Performance Management

PMLD - Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties

PPD - Postgraduate Professional Development

PRU - Pupil Referral Unit

PSA - Public Sector Agreement

PSAs - Parent Support Advisors

QCA - Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

QTS - Qualified Teacher Status

RSM - Recruitment Strategy Manager

SAS - Student Associate Scheme

SCITT - School Centred Initial Teacher Training

SEN - Special Educational Needs

SENCO - Special Educational Needs Coordinator

SIP - School Improvement Partner

SLD - Severe Learning Difficulties

SLT - Senior Leadership Team

SLTs - School Leadership Teams

SSAT - Specialist Schools and Academies Trust

SWiS - Support Work in Schools

TDA - Training and Development Agency

TLP - Teacher Liaison Panel

TLR - Teaching and Learning Responsibility

TYS - Targeted Youth Support

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Executive Summary

1. Background

1.1 As part of its 2008 Work Programme, Hampshire County Council's Children and Young People Select Committee opted to review the issues surrounding the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers in Hampshire schools. National focus on this issue had been growing over many years, with much media attention on the rising trend of teachers leaving the profession adding to pressure to understand the reasons for teachers opting to leave teaching or to pursue alternative careers. Information from the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) relating to teacher supply and demand shows that teacher vacancy rates have fallen nationally in recent years. However, changes in the profile of the teaching workforce have brought about new issues for schools and local authorities to address in ensuring the stability of school teaching and leadership in the future. Of particular concern is a national shortage of headteachers in the near future.

1.2 Within Hampshire, Members were aware of much anecdotal evidence relating to schools' difficulties in recruiting and retaining teachers, but were particularly concerned by data showing the retirement ages of Hampshire's current cohort of headteachers which suggested that a shortage of school leaders could occur from 2009 onwards. In Hampshire, approximately 40% of headteachers are due to retire by 2012, meaning that a large number of heads will need to be recruited in the next five years. Certain parts of the County - notably Basingstoke and Deane - are due to be hit particularly hard by teacher and headteacher vacancies. Certain subjects - particularly Maths, English and Science - also demonstrate recruitment issues.

2. Scope

2.1 With a focus on primary, secondary and special education, Members set out to establish a picture of Hampshire's success in recruiting and retaining high quality teachers and headteachers compared with the national and regional pictures. The review group then focused on the following key questions to conduct their research into the reasons behind difficulties in recruiting and retaining teachers in Hampshire:

3. Method and approach

3.1 In order to establish an evidence base to answer the key questions outlined above, Members opted to undertake a review of national and local policy and practice, and invite written and oral evidence from key stakeholders in a series of Select Committee style sessions in the autumn of 2008. Members also undertook a visit to Shepherd's Down Special School in Compton.

4. Conclusions and Recommendations

4.1 The recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers in Hampshire as a whole does not give particular cause for concern when compared with the national and regional pictures. However, Members are aware that certain parts of the County experience disproportionately large problems, often due to their geographical location within the County. The costs of living in Hampshire along with the County's proximity to alternative employers offering London-weighted salaries arise as key issues, as do the levels of perceived challenge in more disadvantaged areas of the County.

4.2 The critical importance of effective partnership working between the local authority and schools in Hampshire permeates the evidence received by the review group. As the National College for School Leadership asserts, no one agency alone can address issues associated with succession planning. Consideration needs to be made by headteachers, governors, schools and local authorities, as well as other partners at local and national level.

4.3 Hampshire has some excellent local strategies for dealing with recruitment and retention and some - notably programmes delivered through Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College - are leading the way nationally.

4.4 Members were encouraged by much of the evidence heard, but wished to highlight several areas where continued improved performance would benefit Hampshire schools, their pupils and staff. Members have therefore arrived at the following conclusions and recommendations.

4.5 Conclusions relating to information and intelligence about the workforce

4.6 There are particular difficulties in tracking teachers through the system. Not all employers record all movements between schools and so the actual amount, and reasons for, turnover are difficult to determine. This is not conducive to effective workforce planning across Hampshire schools.

4.7 If collected effectively, `tracking' information could also provide an invaluable resource in understanding teachers' career moves and aspirations and in predicting teacher turnover more accurately.

4.8 Currently very little data exists nationally to show how teachers view teaching as a career and what their aspirations for progression are. The General Teaching Council's 2007 survey provides an interesting insight into this from a national perspective, but it would be helpful to understand teachers' aspirations better, thereby informing workforce planning and helping to target continuing professional development where it is most needed. Indeed, the evidence from a Hampshire Newly Qualified Teacher showed that, even from the earliest point in a teaching career, it is possible to have very clear career goals and ideas of how these might be achieved. These ambitions should be captured and nurtured from the earliest possible opportunity so that Hampshire is seen as a good place to work and develop a career. Much good practice is evident on this front, but Members feel that a more strategic approach could assist workforce and succession planning for the future.

Recommendations:

1. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services undertake further work to agree with schools and governing bodies ways in which they may capture more accurate data showing teachers' destinations when they move from or between Hampshire schools, so that they may understand the reasons for teachers leaving Hampshire schools and use this information to devise more effective recruitment and retention strategies.

2. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College consider how information regarding the current workforce's career aspirations can be collected and collated centrally to assist with workforce planning and targeting of continuing professional development.

4.9 Conclusions relating to teacher vacancies

4.10 There is a need to focus recruitment and retention activity on headteacher posts (particularly primary leadership posts), secondary classroom teachers and special school teacher and leadership posts.

4.11 In Hampshire's primary and secondary schools, the vast majority of headteachers fall in the 50-55 age-group. The figures indicate that headteachers typically retire at 60, so it is projected that a large number of Hampshire headteachers will start to retire from 2009 onwards. There were only 5 retirements in 2005 compared to 42 retirements expected in 2009.

4.12 Nationally, the reasons given for why teachers tend not to stay on beyond 60 include burn out, a wish to move to a less stressful position and the ability to retire in relative comfort given the effectiveness of the pension schemes available. Some headteachers return to school support roles (as School Improvement Partners for example), indicating that they are still willing to work beyond 60: that they retain a commitment to education but that they wish to fill less intensive roles.

4.13 Whilst the pending headteacher retirement figures seem alarming, they also offer an opportunity: if, as appears to be the case, headteachers retain their commitment to work in an educational capacity, they represent a potential source of wisdom and experience that can be deployed to benefit the rest of the service. The potential to engage retiring headteachers as mentors, School Improvement Partners, `trouble shooters' or within other school support and improvement roles within the Local Authority is an opportunity that should be explored further. Much work has been achieved on this through Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College but more could be done to facilitate a greater programme of mentoring, secondments and leadership development in Hampshire. One headteacher felt that Hampshire did not offer sufficient counselling and career guidance to headteachers - especially those approaching formal retirement.

Recommendations:

3. That Hampshire Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College undertake further work to identify and log details of retiring headteachers who would be prepared to take on work following retirement in support of Hampshire leadership development and school improvement.

4. That greater resource be invested in offering headteachers advice and counselling on career options after formal retirement.

4.14 Conclusions on gender related factors

4.15 Nationally and locally, there are high numbers of women in primary and special school teaching and leadership posts and yet women are relatively under-represented in secondary leadership posts. There is no Hampshire-specific bias in the gender profile of the workforce and so Members offer the following recommendations in the interests of tackling the gender inequalities present in the teaching workforce as a whole, as outlined in section 3.1 of this report.

Recommendations:

5. That greater emphasis is put on ensuring women in secondary schools have the opportunity and are encouraged to participate in programmes such as those put on by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College.

6. That Education Personnel Services prioritises the recruitment of male teachers into primary schools.

7. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report detailing measures being taken to ensure gender equality in Hampshire's teacher recruitment practices, e.g. through governor training on fair recruitment practice.

4.16 Conclusions relating to the age of the workforce

4.17 Aside from the obvious issue of headteacher retirements, the teaching profession experiences higher wastage in the 25-43 age groups and high proportions of teachers over 50 leaving the profession. National surveys also point to the 30-49 age groups as being less satisfied with their continuous professional development (a key factor in job satisfaction and achieving a quality workforce). The General Teaching Council's 2007 survey provides some interesting insights into the reasons why teachers become dissatisfied with their careers, but similar information is not available in Hampshire. There is, however, a dearth of information nationally to describe the development needs of teachers in these age-groups. This is acknowledged by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College as being a barrier to effective programmes being put in place.

4.18 The implication is that Hampshire is good at offering career support to new teachers and those moving quickly up the ladder. However, when teachers reach the `middle years' of their careers they express less satisfaction with the support they receive. Members believe this is an important issue to be addressed.

Recommendations:

8. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College considers how to capture information about the continuing professional development needs of Hampshire teachers, particularly those in the 35-45 and over 50 age groups.

4.19 Conclusions relating to the ethnicity of the workforce

4.20 Whilst Hampshire has a relatively small black and minority ethnic population, it is currently difficult to see how this population is represented in the teaching workforce, due to the fact that ethnicity data is not collected centrally.

4.21 Some of the evidence suggests that more could be done to encourage BME candidates into teaching, from improving the image of teaching as a career for potential BME teaching candidates, to setting up collaborations between ITT providers and the Local Authority and schools to support improved school-based practice for teachers from less traditional ethnic backgrounds. Hampshire's approach to attracting BME teachers has been described as `complacent' and the evidence suggests that a more strategic approach to BME recruitment would be beneficial, rather than leaving arrangements to local discretion. In the interests of widening the pool of quality candidates for teaching jobs, Members would support further measures to engage high quality BME teachers and school leaders.

Recommendations:

9. That Education Personnel Services leads on the development of a clear strategic statement as to how high quality BME teachers will be recruited and retained in Hampshire. This statement to address elements including the role of governor training, how teaching as a career is `sold' to BME candidates, the role of collaborations between ITT providers and the local authority and schools in facilitating BME teachers' access to appropriate school placements for school-based practice.

4.22 Conclusions relating to pay

4.23 The evidence does not present pay as an overriding factor in recruitment and retention of high quality teachers. Pay is relatively attractive to newly qualified teachers, but job satisfaction, career development and wellbeing are much more important. However, as teachers climb the ladder, the insignificant pay differentials between management posts appears to deter some senior school leaders from aspiring to headship. More needs to be done to sell the very positive messages in the evidence about the high levels of job satisfaction experienced by many headteachers - `the best job in the world' as one witness described it.

4.24 House prices in Hampshire are a major issue for teachers. Governing bodies have the power to adjust pay to a certain extent, but this is not seen as the most effective tool in retaining teachers. Some other way needs to be found to reflect in pay the differential costs of living in parts of the County.

Recommendations:

10. That the Education Advisory Panel commission a report into the full range of financial incentives available to governing bodies to attract teachers to Hampshire, along with details of how these incentives are currently being used in Hampshire schools.

4.25 Conclusions relating to Hampshire's model of education provision

4.26 Hampshire operates in the main an 11-16 and sixth form college model of education. The evidence suggests that this is not the most attractive model from the point of view of teachers. The 11-18 model of education can be more attractive since it provides greater scope for teachers to develop skills in teaching across the full range of age-groups and gives access to older pupils who are more motivated to learn. However, the Government's change in the compulsory school leaving age could change this. In order to provide the same opportunities for teachers to work across age-groups and in a variety of settings, it is therefore important that schools in an area collaborate with each other.

4.27 The need for schools to collaborate cross-phase (primary-secondary-special) and cross curriculum (impact of 14-19 curriculum) cannot be ignored. The positive impacts in terms of continuity of pupil cohesion, education ethos, community relationships and pastoral care are clear in the evidence received by the review group. This issue was raised in evidence from Hampshire Governors' Association who also pointed to the positive impact of collaboration of this type on the effectiveness of governing bodies - ensuring continuity through the school system.

Recommendations:

11. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services ensure that stronger messages about the positive impact of collaborations e.g. school clusters on staff wellbeing and professional development are communicated to schools and governing bodies in Hampshire and that information about such collaborations - and their effectiveness - is reported to the Education Advisory Panel on a regular basis.

12. That the possibility of having schools with sixth forms alongside the sixth form college model be examined further by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), especially given the Government's plans for raising school leaving age.

4.28 Conclusions relating to school image and teacher perceptions

4.29 The insidious effect of negative media images of teaching and teachers is raised time and again in witnesses' evidence. Schools need to be constantly ahead of the game in presenting themselves in the best possible light to counter these often ill-founded views. Schools in more disadvantaged areas often have the greatest difficulty in managing their image due to perceptions that these schools are more challenging places to work. However, the evidence also shows how great the impact of a good headteacher can be in making these schools attractive to staff and improving outcomes for pupils.

Recommendations:

13. That Hampshire Governor Services targets advice to governing bodies on the need to produce high quality promotional material for their schools, including school websites.

14. That the Education Advisory Panel reviews the feasibility of asking the most outstanding headteachers to work in the most disadvantaged areas, possibly on a part-time or secondment basis.

15. That the highly damaging effects of negative media coverage on the teaching profession are countered by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) in Hampshire through a constant campaign to praise the achievements of schools and their staff.

16. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers using some of the positive findings of this review to promote Hampshire as an excellent place to develop a career in teaching.

4.30 Conclusions relating to workforce reform

4.31 Long working hours and the burdens of administration and inspection are commonly cited drawbacks of teaching as a career. The Government's workforce reforms were intended to address teacher work-life balance, but the evidence indicates that much more needs to be done to implement these reforms, particularly in increasing administrative support in schools. Suggestions from some stakeholders indicate that further monitoring of reform implementation should be undertaken in Hampshire and the evidence also highlights that new Government regulations will require local authorities to report non-compliance with the reforms from 2009 onwards.

4.32 Members agreed that there could be some merit in investigating more flexible models of career path for Hampshire teachers in order to improve staff wellbeing. The review group also concluded that clear arrangements to support newly appointed headteachers are required so as to support school leaders in their role and ensure that expectations of performance and quality are made apparent from the start.

4.33 The new models of headship available to schools are still relatively untested and there is little evidence of their use and impact in Hampshire (although there is evidence of very successful application in some parts of the County). The evidence clearly shows that traditional forms of headship will not suffice in the face of such enormous change for schools brought about by initiatives such as the 14-19 curriculum and the development of Children's Centres. The role of headteachers is now more focused on inter-agency and cross-boundary leadership and brokerage, meaning that many `traditional' headteacher functions need to be carried out by deputies and other school managers to spread the burgeoning workload. This presents opportunities and threats for teachers. Whilst the use of new models of headship awards opportunities to staff to have a taster of leadership, some teachers are concerned that the role of headteacher is becoming ever more removed from the classroom. Some more `traditional' headteachers and governing bodies can find it difficult to come to terms with the fact that modern school leaders require a different skill set to be effective. This in turn impacts on recruitment and selection procedures for headteachers. This represents a significant culture change for governing bodies which will require greater support and monitoring to implement effectively.

Recommendations:

17. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report on the impact of forthcoming regulations relating to the local authority role to report non-compliance with workforce reforms. This report to include details of roles and responsibilities for monitoring compliance.

18. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report considering opportunities for introducing flexible career paths for teachers in Hampshire (i.e. use of gap years) to improve staff wellbeing.

19. That Hampshire Governor Services investigates ways of raising awareness and providing information about the use of more flexible staffing arrangements, including new models of headship, for governing bodies in Hampshire.

20. That the need for governors to make full consideration of the options available to provide administrative support to teachers/headteachers is promoted and monitored by Hampshire Governor Services and Education Personnel Services.

21. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report providing information about schools which have implemented workforce reforms, with details of their impact and outcomes.

22. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College ensure that mentoring and training support to new headteachers is provided as an organisational norm immediately on appointment.

4.34 Conclusions relating to Newly Qualified Teachers

4.35 Recruitment and retention of NQTs is good in Hampshire but Members believe that more needs to be done to identify and develop talent from the earliest stages of a teacher's career. This point is addressed by recommendation 2 of this report.

4.36 Members were interested by references to `informal' recruitment practices being used by schools to target NQTs. This `tap on the shoulder' technique can be flattering to NQTs who may be concerned about securing their first job, but may lead to inappropriate placements in schools which then bring about retention issues later. Members felt there was also sufficiently compelling evidence to suggest that Hampshire may need to increase its visibility at promotional events such as university recruitment fairs.

4.37 Finally, evidence from several initial teacher training providers in the South East shows that they would welcome the opportunity to work in partnership with local authorities in order to devise strategies to address recruitment to initial teacher training in shortage subjects.

Recommendations:

23. That Education Personnel Services develops stronger links with initial teacher training providers in order to present the best career opportunities to NQTs and allow them to make considered choices when seeking their first teaching jobs i.e. through presence at career fairs.

24. That Education Personnel Services considers the benefit of working with the region's initial teacher training providers to address recruitment to initial teacher training for shortage subjects.

4.38 Conclusions relating to governing bodies

4.39 The review group found the practical effectiveness of governing bodies difficult to judge. Governing bodies have a statutory role and defined powers, but the quality of governing bodies still varies enormously. There is a tendency for good schools to have good governing bodies, and vice versa. Indeed, it is quite usual for a poorly achieving school to have governor vacancies, including Chair of Governors.

4.40 The role of the governing body in ensuring quality in the workforce is critical. However, the review group found that governing bodies tend to see their role as supporting rather than leading. Evidence from several stakeholders demonstrates an urgent need for governing bodies to do much more to fulfil their responsibilities in taking action and proactively escalating when there is a performance or leadership issue in the school. Evidence suggests that, when headteachers are struggling, they tend to dominate their governing body and this can lead to criticisms being suppressed. Governing bodies must become more aware of their powers and responsibilities so that they are less likely to be the `rubber stamp' for the headteacher.

4.41 The School Improvement Partner is critical in ensuring that issues are raised early in the day. The SIP is the only independent role capable of initiating action to address issues as they arise. The need for the SIP to have a good relationship with governing bodies and headteachers, whilst retaining an element of positive challenge, is vital. It is most important that the relationship does not become too `comfortable'.

4.42 Training opportunities for governing bodies are excellent in Hampshire, but uptake is not always as good as it could be. Accessing training can be difficult, whether due to the timing or location of training. It was also pointed out that some governors have to pay their own travelling costs to access training which is a disincentive.

4.43 The evidence also indicates that governing bodies need to be more proactive in signalling to the local authority when they have teaching posts coming vacant so that appropriate planning can be put in train to fill the gap.

Recommendations:

25. That Hampshire Governor Services makes better use of opportunities to deliver training to clusters of schools in local areas to reduce travelling time for governing bodies and improve access to governor training across the board.

26. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how a requirement could be made for school governors to undertake a certain amount of compulsory training on managing performance in schools.

27. That School Improvement Partners do not support the same school(s) for more than 3 years, so as to maintain the independence of the SIP and its ability to challenge school performance in a constructive way.

28. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how the Local Authority and Hampshire schools could create a requirement for School Improvement Partners to submit regular reports to governing bodies on agreed aspects of school performance in order to provide early indications of any upcoming performance or staffing issues.

4.44 Conclusions relating to leadership development programmes

4.45 The excellence of Hampshire's leadership development programmes is indisputable. Evidence from the National College for School Leadership shows Hampshire to be a national leader in this field and Members were left with no doubt of the quality of programmes available to Hampshire teachers in this respect.

4.46 Members felt that more could be done to assess the true impact on the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers of programmes delivered by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College. The review group felt that there was currently a lack of clearly articulated strategic outcomes for this area of work and that this represented a lost opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of HTLC's work. Members believe that more thorough evaluation of HTLC programmes is needed and that success stories should be more widely celebrated.

4.47 Awareness of HTLC's leadership programmes needs to be increased in Hampshire schools and, as a consequence to this, more resources may be required to cater for an increase in the number of participants on the programmes (which the review group would welcome). The review group also felt that improved targeting of HTLC's programmes to groups currently underrepresented in the workforce (i.e. women secondary leaders, male primary and special teachers) would be an effective way of widening the talent pool for school leaders. Again, this would have an impact on current levels of resources.

Recommendations:

29. That an overarching strategy for school leadership development in Hampshire is drawn up stating the full strategic aims of the programmes and identifying clear success criteria against which progress can be monitored and evaluated.

30. That information about the Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College's projects forms part of Member induction training at HCC, in time for the new administration in 2009.

31. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), together with the Schools Forum, considers the cost-benefit of investing more heavily in HTLC's leadership development projects, to increase the programmes' capacity and improve awareness of their availability amongst schools and governing bodies as a way of protecting the school workforce of the future in Hampshire.

32. That the Executive Member for Children's Services considers how a requirement could be put in place for all Hampshire headteachers to evaluate future potential amongst their staff and enable teachers to participate in leadership training.

4.48 Conclusions relating to quality

4.49 The quality of the workforce was a key theme Members wished to address under this review. Whilst questions of quality are embedded within the main body of this report, Members wished to highlight their conclusions relating to the importance of school performance management frameworks in this context. The evidence makes it clear that individual schools and governing bodies have a significant role in the day-to-day management of quality through identifying and developing teachers with potential, providing opportunities for development and progression and recognising and celebrating achievements. Clear performance management arrangements help schools to identify where performance is wavering, therefore providing ample opportunity for a school to signal to its local authority or School Improvement Partner that assistance is required. Strong leadership, good opportunities for professional development and a culture which celebrates achievement are all attractive to good staff and are key to successful recruitment and retention. The evidence suggests that some schools in Hampshire may need to increase their focus on performance management in order to attract and retain high quality staff.

4.50 Conclusions relating to special schools

4.51 Special schools experience many of the same problems as mainstream schools in recruiting and retaining high quality teachers and headteachers, such as high levels of vacancies in the north of Hampshire. However, several issues particular to special schools were raised in the evidence which Members wish to highlight.

4.52 The lack of specific initial teacher training for Special Educational Needs appears as a major issue for special school recruitment and retention. Whilst some schools have used the Graduate Teacher Programme as an effective training ground for special school teachers, the lack of support to trainee teachers wishing to specialise in special education is a huge barrier to achieving this aim.

4.53 Members heard evidence that, whilst the Training and Development Agency for Schools is looking at ways of improving the focus on SEN in Initial Teacher Training, trainee teachers are not generally permitted to undertake placements in special schools during their training despite having shown an interest in special education. Some teachers in mainstream schools undertake secondments to special schools to acquire on-the-job training, although the evidence shows that such secondments are extremely difficult for special schools to manage due to the support requirements of the secondee in a special school environment.

4.54 All these factors have led to a lack of teachers with SEN knowledge.

4.55 Members were also interested by discussions about the role of special school education. Whilst the evidence shows that the County's Inclusion and SEN policies make the role and responsibilities of special schools clear, there appears to be some debate as to whether children with the most severe and complex needs are suffering in special schools as a result of children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties being placed in multiple learning difficulty schools. This is a complex debate, but relevant to the issue of teacher job satisfaction and so Members feel that this issue may need to be probed further.

Recommendations:

33. That, as part of its focus on special school recruitment in 2009, Education Personnel Services investigates with initial teacher training providers and Hampshire special schools ways of addressing the shortage of teachers with specialist SEN knowledge in Hampshire.

34. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools, ensures that career opportunities for staff in special schools are more visibly promoted and encouraged.

35. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools and initial teacher training providers, investigate the best ways to provide school-based practice for trainee teachers in Hampshire special schools.

36. That the Education Advisory Panel commissions a report on the role of multiple learning difficulty schools in educating children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Report of the Review Group

1. Introduction

1.1 As part of its 2008 Work Programme, Hampshire County Council's Children and Young People Select Committee opted to review the issues surrounding the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers in Hampshire schools. National focus on this issue has been growing over many years, with much media attention on the rising trend of teachers leaving the profession adding to pressure to understand the reasons for teachers opting to leave teaching or to pursue alternative careers. Information from the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) relating to teacher supply and demand shows that teacher vacancy rates have fallen nationally in recent years. However, changes in the profile of the teaching workforce have brought about new issues for schools and local authorities to address in ensuring the stability of school teaching and leadership in the future. Of particular concern is a national shortage of headteachers in the near future.

1.2 Within Hampshire, Members were aware of much anecdotal evidence relating to schools' difficulties in recruiting and retaining teachers, but were particularly concerned by data showing the retirement ages of Hampshire's current cohort of headteachers which suggested that a shortage of school leaders could occur from 2009 onwards. In Hampshire, approximately 40% of headteachers are due to retire by 2012, meaning that a large number of heads will need to be recruited in the next five years. Certain parts of the County - notably Basingstoke and Deane - are due to be hit particularly hard by teacher and headteacher vacancies. Certain subjects - particularly Maths, English and Science - also demonstrate recruitment issues.

1.3 It is worth noting the economic climate in which this report was produced. The economic downturn of late 2008 may stand to have an impact on teacher recruitment from 2009 onwards as people who find themselves in insecure employment or without work may look to teaching as a secure option. However, as one stakeholder pointed out in their evidence, one can only second guess at the effects such a situation will have on recruitment and retention of teachers and so this report does not focus on this issue in any great depth.

1.4 Scope

1.4.1 In deciding on the areas for investigation within this review, Members agreed the following scope:

1.5 Method and approach

1.5.1 In order to establish an evidence base to answer the questions outlined above, Members opted to undertake a review of national and local policy and practice, and invite written and oral evidence from key stakeholders in a series of Select Committee style sessions in the autumn of 2008. Members also undertook a visit to Shepherd's Down Special School in Compton.

1.6 Members of the Review Group

1.6.1 The following members conducted the Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers:

1.6.2 The members of the review group would like to thank all witnesses who gave their time to provide evidence to this review. The quality of evidence received was high and provided members with an invaluable insight to this complex area. Members would like to give particular thanks to Jane Sansome, Headteacher of Shepherd's Down School, for hosting a visit from the review group and providing an excellent briefing on issues relating to special schools in Hampshire.

2. Findings of the Review

2.1 Having collected evidence within the scope of the review (outlined in section 1.4 of this report), Members' findings are presented in sections 2.2-12 of this document.

2.2 Background and Context - introduction

2.2.1 The information in this section helps to establish a picture of Hampshire's success in recruiting and retaining teachers and headteachers compared with the national picture.

2.2.2 A snapshot of the 2007 Hampshire Joint Area Review shows that there are approximately 309,000 children and young people aged 0-19 with over 172,000 pupils in 541 maintained schools in Hampshire. The area is a mix of urban and rural population with areas of affluence and significant areas of deprivation, with three areas in Havant ranked as among the most deprived in the country.

2.2.3 Pre-16 education is provided by:

2.2.4 Hampshire's 2007 Annual Performance Assessment confirmed that the authority provides excellent education and has an excellent capacity for further improvement. The 2008 APA highlights consistently above average attainment in Hampshire schools when compared to the national picture, with improved attendance on previous years.

2.3 Background and Context - pupil numbers

2.3.1 Pupil numbers - national: From a national perspective, pupil numbers in primary, secondary and maintained special schools in England have been falling in the past few years. Data from the DCSF at Annexe A (and the summary information in Figure 1) show a steady decline from 2004 to 2008 in all school categories and the DCSF predicts further decline in 2009.

2.3.2 Pupil numbers - local: Hampshire mirrors the national situation although, as shown in Figure 2, whilst secondary schools pupil numbers are predicted to continue with a downward trend in forthcoming years, primary pupil numbers are expected to rise.

Pupils in maintained schools by type, 1992/93 to 2006/07 (actual) and 2007/08 to 2008/09 (projected)

Figure 1. Source: DCSF.

Figure 2: Long term pupil number trends in Hampshire.

2.4 Background and Context - surplus school places

2.4.1 Surplus school places - national: Data from the DCSF therefore shows that overall pupil numbers are now in decline nationally. The decline in births since 1990 has resulted in fewer pupils in maintained nursery and primary schools since 1999 and fewer pupils in maintained secondary schools since 2004. Consequently, surplus places in nursery and primary schools have been increasing since 1999, and for secondary schools since 2004. See Figure 3.

Figure 3. Source: DCSF.

2.4.2 Surplus school places - Hampshire: Detail from Hampshire's Surplus Places Return 2008 shows that, as at January 2008, 9.64% of primary school places were surplus. In secondary schools, 8.4% of places were surplus, although whereas primary pupil numbers are predicted to rise in the forthcoming years, secondary pupil numbers are due to decline (see Figure 2). Within Hampshire, there are some significant variations in pupil numbers and surplus places. As at January 2008, areas containing schools with more than 10% surplus capacity were:

2.4.3 Looking to the future, the impact of new housing developments on pupil numbers is significant, but not easy to predict. If no account is taken of changes in the age and household composition of the population and movement within the County, 94,290 new dwellings could generate a demand for nearly 24,000 primary and 16,000 secondary age pupil places over a 15 year period, with further large numbers to follow. However, current forecasts show that migration within the County (families moving into new larger properties within the County for example) may not necessarily increase the overall number of school age children, but may shift current patterns of demand. However, a certain amount of migration into the County will increase pupil numbers overall.

2.4.4 As at January 2009, proposals in the South East Plan show minimum net additional dwelling requirements in Hampshire to impact much more greatly on some parts of Hampshire than others. Since surplus places are rarely averaged out between schools in an area, and the reasons for surplus places are not always population-based (for example parental preference can play a part), the pressure on popular schools may still increase with extra housing development and schools may not exist where they are needed.

2.5 Background and Context - teacher vacancies

2.5.1 Teacher vacancies - the national context: The table at Figure 4 provides DCSF data on Full time vacancy rates in local authority maintained schools from 1997-2008. This data shows advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments, or appointments of at least one term's duration. It also includes vacancies being filled on a temporary basis of less than one term.

TABLE 6: Full-time vacancy rates in local authority maintained schools by grade.

Years: January 1997, 2000 to 2008. Coverage: England

Vacancies as a percentage of teachers in post2

Number of

 

vacancies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1997

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NURSERY AND PRIMARY

All vacancies

Number

1,090

1,420

2,110

1,800

1,110

780

740

710

660

870

Rate

0.6

0.8

1.2

1.0

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.5

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

0.9

1.0

1.2

1.0

0.8

0.7

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.8

290

Head

0.6

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.5

0.5

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.6

110

Deputy head/Assistant head

1.3

1.3

1.8

1.2

1.1

1.0

0.8

0.9

0.7

1.0

180

Classroom teacher

0.5

0.8

1.2

1.1

0.6

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.4

580

SECONDARY

All vacancies

Number

730

1,250

2,590

2,450

2,050

1,630

1,550

1,340

1,210

1,470

Rate

0.4

0.7

1.4

1.3

1.1

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.8

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

0.7

1.0

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.4

0.4

90

Head

0.8

1.1

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.5

1.0

0.9

0.5

0.6

20

Deputy head/Assistant head

0.7

0.9

0.7

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.4

60

Classroom teacher

0.4

0.7

1.5

1.4

1.2

0.9

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.8

1,390

SPECIAL

All vacancies

Number

200

240

280

290

240

220

190

180

170

170

Rate

1.5

1.9

2.2

2.4

2.0

1.8

1.6

1.6

1.4

1.4

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

1.9

2.5

1.7

1.6

1.2

1.0

1.3

1.5

1.3

0.9

30

Head

1.2

2.5

1.0

1.1

1.0

0.8

0.9

1.6

1.2

0.7

10

Deputy head/Assistant head

2.7

2.6

2.3

2.0

1.4

1.2

1.5

1.4

1.4

1.1

20

Classroom teacher

1.4

1.8

2.3

2.6

2.2

2.0

1.7

1.6

1.4

1.5

140

Figure 4. Source DCSF

2.5.2 The data highlights the following key points relating to national teacher vacancies:

2.5.3 Teacher vacancies - the regional view: Vacancy rates in local authority maintained nursery/primary, secondary and special schools by Government Office Region can be found at Annexe B. This information shows that the overall vacancy rate in Hampshire is the same as the South East average, but worse than the England average. Secondary schools have higher numbers of vacancies compared with primary and special schools.

2.5.4 Teacher vacancies - the Hampshire picture: In the 2007 evaluation of the Hampshire Children and Young People Plan, progress with the recruitment and retention of teachers was summarised as follows:

2.5.5 Data from Hampshire's Education Personnel Service at Annexe C shows a steady increase in teacher vacancy adverts from 2006 onwards. A significant jump from 2007 to 2008 is notable in these figures, with primary schools experiencing a 23% increase over this period (lower than the national figure of 31%)1 and secondary schools 22% (as opposed to 21% nationally)*. Secondary vacancies are higher than primary overall. Figure 5 below provides a very basic overview of job adverts placed in Hampshire from 2003-8. It is worth noting that the increase in support vacancies in 2007-8 may be due to schools' responses to national workforce reforms whereby more administrative and support posts are being created in schools (see section 8.2 of this report for more information).

 

Primary

 

 

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

Teaching

 

662

578

711

729

Support

 

348

398

378

493

Secondary

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

Teaching 

584

533

622

782

Support 

218

293

308

572

Figure 5: Total teaching job adverts placed in Hampshire.

2.5.6 Teacher vacancies by subject: Data showing the national picture of teacher vacancy rates, broken down by school subject and teacher grade can be found at Annexes D and E. This information shows a relatively stable picture in teacher vacancy numbers in recent years, although vacancies in teaching posts for Maths, Sciences and English have been consistently high for some time (and increased slightly in 2008).

2.5.7 Annexe F shows Hampshire vacancy statistics by subject matter and by district council area. In line with the national picture, English, Maths and Science come top of the vacancy league. In terms of geographical differences, Basingstoke and Deane appear to experience much greater difficulties in filling secondary teaching posts than other parts of the County. This also applies to primary posts, as shown at Annexe C.

2.5.8 Turnover and wastage: Data from the DCSF shows that turnover and wastage have both dropped in English schools since 2004/5. The South East region, however, has higher turnover and wastage levels than the national average - 10.2% in 2005-6 as opposed to 9.8% in all of England.2 Wastage (retirements and teachers leaving service) appears to be consistent regardless of pay level, sex and school type, although there is greater wastage of teachers over 50 and notable wastage in the 25-34 age-group.3 Turnover is notoriously difficult to pinpoint as current data from the DCSF includes wastage, transfers to other establishments within the maintained schools sector and teachers leaving to part-time service. Not all employers record all movements between schools within their area and so rates are understated. In Hampshire, data is based on vacancies that are advertised and not necessarily turnover. For example, some posts may be changed, and others left unfilled or reorganised and filled internally. Hampshire's Education Personnel Services advise that the number of vacancies carried by a school in any year is not a sound indicator of staff turnover. On one hand it could indicate that the school cannot retain staff, on the other that staff that had been in role a long time were seeking promotion or leaving for legitimate purposes. That said, EPS also highlights that Hampshire special schools have a lower rate of turnover than their mainstream counterparts.

2.6 Background and Context - teacher vacancies: future forecasts

2.6.1 Teacher vacancies - future forecasts: Whilst the last few years have seen relatively stable numbers of teachers vacancies, there is little dispute amongst all stakeholders that the future looks less secure, particularly for school leadership posts.

2.6.2 Of significant concern in Hampshire is the age profile of the headteacher workforce and data on this has therefore been collected for several years. Data from the DCSF at Figure 6 shows the total number of retirements increasing year on year nationally. Retirements related to ill-health and premature retirements have dropped, but age-related retirement is increasing.

Coverage: England

Retirements from local authority maintained schools - Type of award by sex and year of award: 1989-90 to 2007-08.

Premature 2,3

Age3

Ill-health 4

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Men and

Men and

Men and

Men and

Men

Women

Women

Men

Women

Women

Men

Women

Women

Men

Women

Women

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial year

(1 April to 31 March)

1989-90

3,220

4,840

8,060

960

2,550

3,500

1,270

2,310

3,580

5,440

9,700

15,140

1990-91

3,000

4,740

7,740

890

2,610

3,500

1,420

2,860

4,280

5,310

10,210

15,520

1991-92

2,470

4,070

6,530

810

2,360

3,170

1,390

2,640

4,030

4,660

9,070

13,730

1992-93

2,760

4,400

7,170

750

2,560

3,310

1,440

2,610

4,050

4,950

9,580

14,530

1993-94

3,180

4,860

8,030

850

2,580

3,430

1,840

2,990

4,820

5,860

10,420

16,290

1994-95

2,730

4,390

7,120

780

2,740

3,520

1,970

3,310

5,290

5,490

10,440

15,930

1995-96

3,360

5,240

8,600

760

2,720

3,480

1,870

3,290

5,160

5,990

11,250

17,240

1996-97

3,840

6,370

10,210

700

2,600

3,300

1,810

3,170

4,980

6,360

12,130

18,490

1997-98 5

4,340

7,010

11,350

810

2,770

3,590

1,200

2,070

3,260

6,350

11,850

18,200

1998-99 5

950

1,430

2,370

850

3,000

3,840

850

1,440

2,280

2,640

5,860

8,500

1999-00 5

1,140

1,510

2,650

1,000

3,280

4,280

860

1,470

2,320

2,990

6,260

9,250

2000-01 5

1,270

1,890

3,160

1,000

3,240

4,240

1,040

1,590

2,630

3,300

6,720

10,020

2001-02 5

1,320

2,150

3,470

1,100

3,350

4,450

920

1,460

2,380

3,340

6,960

10,300

2002-03 5

1,510

2,440

3,960

1,320

3,730

5,060

770

1,260

2,030

3,610

7,430

11,040

2003-04 5

1,910

3,030

4,930

1,460

4,180

5,630

770

1,100

1,870

4,130

8,300

12,430

2004-05 5

2,400

3,660

6,060

1,680

4,850

6,530

620

950

1,580

4,700

9,460

14,160

2005-06 5,6

2,650

3,990

6,640

1,630

4,770

6,400

570

930

1,500

4,860

9,680

14,540

2006-07 5,6

2,950

4,520

7,460

2,060

6,450

8,510

400

700

1,100

5,410

11,670

17,070

2007-08 5,6

2,790

4,660

7,440

2,480

7,420

9,900

230

450

680

5,500

12,520

18,020

Figure 6

 2.6.3 In terms of the age-profile of Hampshire headteachers, a study by Hampshire's Education Personnel Services showed there to be 536 headteachers in Hampshire in 2005, the majority of these being aged between 46 and 55 (see Figure 7). From 2009 onwards, the projected number of headteacher retirements increases significantly (see Figure 8).

Figure 7: Hampshire County-wide headteacher age profile., 2005

 Figure 8: Projected retirement dates of all Hampshire headteachers.

2.6.4 The graphs at Figures 9-11 show that the age profile of headteachers varies depending on school type. The age profile of primary headteachers mirrors that of the countywide headteacher profile. Secondary heads show a greater proportion of 50-55 year-olds, whereas the profile of special school heads is particularly significant with 32% of headteachers being over 55. In previous years, the age profile of headteachers has been similar, although there has been a marked decrease in the number of headteachers aged between 46-55 and subsequent increases in those aged between 56-60 and 36-45.

Figure 9: Age of Hampshire primary headteachers

Figure 10: Age of Hampshire secondary headteachers.

Figure 11: Age of Hampshire special school headteachers.

2.6.5 To assist in understanding the reasons why headteachers leave the profession, Figure 12 provides Hampshire information for 2003-5. Figure 13 provides the same information for the 2007-8 academic year. Retirement is consistently the most commonly quoted reason, although resignation is also prominent.

Figure 12: Headteacher reasons for leaving 2003-5.

Figure 13: Headteacher reasons for leaving, 2007-8.

2.6.6 Figure 14 reinforces the issues discussed earlier in this report that Basingstoke and Deane is the area experiencing the greatest difficulties in filling headteacher posts.

Figure 14: Headteacher vacancies by district, 2007/8.

3. Profile of the Workforce

3.1 Gender of the workforce

3.1.1 Data from the DCSF provides the following information on the gender profile of the teaching workforce in 20074.

3.1.2 Nursery and primary:

3.1.3 These figures clearly show that, whilst women constitute a large part of the workforce, they are relatively under-represented in leadership positions. The National College for School Leadership's publication Gender and Headship in the 21st Century deals exclusively with the issues of developing women as school leaders. The report draws on studies into gender-related experiences of male and female headteachers from the 1990s up to 2004. Key findings include:

3.1.4 In providing evidence to the review, the National Association of Headteachers drew attention to NCSL's Gender and Headship document and felt that the findings were well-made and representative of the situation as they saw it.

3.2 Age of the workforce

3.2.1 DCSF data shows the following age profile of the teaching workforce in England.5

3.2.2 The National College for School Leadership claims that the decline in the number of teachers in their late 30s to mid-40s suggest that a shortage of headteachers could occur in the near future. Current forecasts indicate that 50% of headteachers nationally will retire by 2012. As discussed in section 2.6 of this report, the Hampshire picture is similar.

3.3 Ethnicity of the workforce

3.3.1 Data from DCSF shows the following ethnic profile of the teaching workforce in England: 6

3.3.2 At present, Hampshire does not collect gender and ethnicity information centrally as schools are responsible for their own recruitment and for keeping records of teacher profiles. However, DCSF data by Government Office region shows that 96% of teachers in Hampshire describes themselves as `White British'.

3.3.3 Hampshire compares with its surrounding local authorities as follows: Portsmouth - 94%; Southampton - 92%; Kent - 92%; Surrey - 90%; W. Sussex - 96%

3.3.4 Evidence from Hampshire Governor's Association shows how minority ethnic groups are under-represented in the Hampshire workforce. With more than 80 different ethnic groups in Hampshire, very few of these are represented in the workforce - for example, in Rushmoor, where there is a large Nepalese population, there is currently only one Nepalese teacher.

3.3.5 The National College for School Leadership's 2005 publication Black and Minority Ethnic Leaders outlines the experience of black and minority ethnic (BME) leaders at all levels in English primary and secondary schools. The key issues arising from this study can be outlined as follows:

3.3.6 Evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel Service claims that more overseas trained teachers are being interviewed, trained and employed in Hampshire which may have a future impact on the number of BME teachers in the County. However no evidence exists at present to illustrate this development. Indeed, evidence from the National Association of Headteachers describes Hampshire's current approach to attracting BME teachers as `complacent' and recommends that a strategic approach is required rather than leaving this to local discretion.

3.3.7 Interestingly, Southampton University's evidence highlights nationally set targets relating to the diversity of the workforce. Southampton points out that this work needs to be taken forward in conjunction with schools so that the right kinds of experiences can be supported in school-based practice for candidates from less traditional ethnic backgrounds. Southampton's Primary and Secondary PGCE courses have made this a key area for action over the next three years and the university would welcome collaborative discussions with the local authority and schools to achieve a more diverse workforce. It is worth noting that Southampton has attracted a number of European teachers in its recent cohorts, including Polish teachers. This represents a significant change on recent years and so the University is monitoring closely these students' success on the course and in achieving employment.

3.4 People with disabilities in the workforce

3.4.1 A 2007 report from the National Foundation for Educational Research7 found that people with disabilities were under-represented in the teaching profession, despite the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) stating that at least five per cent of those recruited to ITT should have a registered disability.

3.5 Summary profile of the workforce

3.5.1 The `typical' profiles of the teaching workforce in England can therefore be summarised as follows:

3.5.2 The National college for School Leadership's `Succession: An Overview' suggests that encouraging more women and BME teachers to take leadership roles would not only widen the talent pool for leadership, but would also make school leadership more representative of the workforce.

4. Recruitment to subject areas

4.1 As referred to earlier in this document, data showing the national picture of teacher vacancy rates, broken down by school subject and teacher grade can be found at Annexes D and E. This information shows a relatively stable picture in teacher vacancy numbers in recent years, although vacancies in teaching posts for Maths, Sciences and English have been consistently high for some time (and increased slightly in 2008). Special schools demonstrate higher vacancy rates across the board when compared with primary and secondary schools.

4.2 Annexe F shows Hampshire vacancy statistics by subject matter and by district council area. In line with the national picture, English, Maths and Science come top of the vacancy league. However, information from Hampshire's Education Personnel Service highlights that there are also concerns about shortages in Modern Foreign Languages, ICT, Drama and Physical Education.

4.3 The following charts from the DCSF at Figures 15 and 16 show the intake to initial teacher training courses from 1991 to 2008. It is interesting to note that, whilst primary ITT is almost consistently oversubscribed over time, secondary has been almost entirely undersubscribed.

Figure 15

Figure 16

4.4 The chart at Figure 17 shows the percentage change in recruitment to secondary initial teacher training by subject from 2005-8. The commentary below Figure 17 highlights those subjects experiencing the greatest difficulty in attracting trainee teachers.

Figure 17

4.5 As described later in this report, Hampshire schools and the local authority have tried a variety of methods to address the shortage of teachers in particular subjects, including supporting recruitment fairs and campaigns, but continue to have difficulties in much the same way as the rest of the country. However, evidence from Southampton University claims that there would be benefit in the University working in partnership with local authorities to devise national and local recruitment campaigns to attract candidates to their courses - most particularly those courses in Modern Foreign Languages, IT and Music.

4.6 At national level, there are many initiatives aimed at recruiting teachers to shortage subject areas, including providing information, marketing, improving salary levels and tackling negative perceptions of teaching. From September 1999, those doing Postgraduate Certificates in Education (PGCEs) in maths and science were eligible for `Golden Hellos' of £5,000 - half paid during training and half on taking up a relevant post. From September 2000, postgraduate secondary trainees received a training salary of £6,000.  In addition, those training in maths, modern foreign languages, science and technology received a `Golden Hello' of £4,000. As at August 2008, Golden Hello payments were as follows:

Figure 18

4.7 From August 2008, eligible postgraduate trainee teachers are also entitled to a tax-free bursary. The value of this depends on where students train, the subject they train to teach, and when they start their course. See Figure 19.

Figure 19

4.8 With regard to recruitment to subject areas, Hampshire therefore reflects the national picture. In reviewing evidence from stakeholders however, Members noted references to the fact that some subjects in secondary school - notably Maths, English and Science - may currently be taught by non-specialists in Hampshire.

5. Summary - How successful is Hampshire in recruiting and retaining teachers and headteachers when compared to the national picture?

5.1 A brief overview of the information presented in Sections 2-4 of this report presents the following context for recruitment and retention in Hampshire, compared with the national picture:

5.2 Based on the data presented in this section of the report, Hampshire's success in recruiting and retaining teachers, when compared to the national picture, does not give significant cause for concern per se, although the need to address imminent shortages of headteachers and deputies is clear. This initial conclusion is supported in evidence from the National Association of Headteachers which states that `Hampshire is not alone in experiencing recruitment and retention difficulties in headteachers and deputy headteachers. There are a number of complex and interrelated issues which have combined to create a recruitment crisis of headteachers'.

5.3 The need to safeguard a quality workforce of the future is clear: the approach to achieving this in Hampshire is therefore of great interest to Members.

6. The story behind the data - An introduction to recruitment and retention for schools

6.1 As shown at Annexe F, teacher vacancy rates across the County vary quite significantly. Certain subjects are more difficult to recruit to and, as section 3 of this report shows, there are significant social groups under-represented in the Hampshire teaching workforce. All these factors have brought about a need to devise approaches - nationally and locally - to target particular geographical and social areas in the recruitment and retention of teachers. The NCSL asserts that whilst problems in recruiting and retaining teachers are national issues, they require local solutions devised by those people who best understand the local context.

6.2 School vacancies are often advertised by the local authority in which they are available. Many local authorities also have dedicated staff to support teacher recruitment, as in Hampshire. Increasingly, jobs are being advertised online, but traditional methods such as press advertising are also still used.

6.3 Individual schools and governing bodies are responsible for recruiting and retaining their staff and managing their own budgets for this purpose. However, some teacher shortages affect a whole area or subject. Where this is the case, recruitment strategies are thought to be more effective if schools and local authorities work together and learn from each other's experiences.

6.4 Local authorities are key delivery partners for the national Training and Development Agency for Schools. The TDA is the sector body for the school workforce in England and is responsible for ensuring that the training and development opportunities available to schools and their staff are fit for purpose, meet their needs and recognise their skills. Each local authority employs an adviser (a Local Authority Workforce Team Member), partly funded by the TDA, whose role includes working with schools and the authority to raise the quality and impact of training and development, and to identify and share effective practice. LAWTMs also feed local ideas about skills gaps and training and development priorities back to the TDA to help authorities develop appropriate support. In Hampshire, this role was in place until September 2007, since when the role has been distributed.

6.5 The TDA allocates funding to all 150 local authorities in England including:

6.6 Schools and local authorities need to work together in order to plan and anticipate problems in recruiting and retaining teachers. Guidance from the DCSF makes clear that schools that think they may be in difficulty should signal this early to their local authority. Until recently, Recruitment Strategy Managers (RSMs) were in role in most local authority areas and, through their national network and links with the TDA, RSMs were able to advise on what has been tried elsewhere, either locally or nationally. Funding has now ceased for RSMs but the TDA continues to fund local authorities for their recruitment strategies. Hampshire schools are encouraged to operate and develop in a way which serves their local community, reflecting the cultural diversity the County has to offer. The County Council believes that this is best achieved through local management, with the local authority providing a supporting role wherever needed.

6.7 In early 2009, the DCSF aims to launch a new online service to provide schools and local authorities in England with a better process for recruiting permanent teaching and support staff. A more efficient and user-friendly application system is anticipated to improve school recruitment processes. That said, evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel Services shows that Hampshire's EPS website exceeds 100,000 hits in peak recruitment months, proving that it already achieves good coverage amongst prospective teachers.

6.8 The DCSF provides a checklist for the recruitment and retention of teachers which outlines many of the tools available to schools in recruiting and retaining their staff. A key message is that improving retention is the most effective long-term answer. Teaching, as a profession, has an excellent retention record. However, when asked by researchers, most teachers said they left a school because they were unhappy with management.

6.9 Financial incentives are one of the tools available to schools and local authorities in recruiting and retaining teachers. Under the School Teachers' Pay and Conditions Act 1991, the statutory pay and conditions of school teachers are determined following recommendations from the School Teachers Review Body. In response to these recommendations, from September 1999, teachers' pay increases are linked to the achievement of performance objectives. Clear performance management and opportunities for professional development for teachers are therefore most significant in this context, to allow teachers to progress in their careers and realise financial rewards.

6.10 Other incentives aimed at retaining teachers and developing talent have included the Fast Track teaching programme. The current Fast Track is due to be replaced by a new accelerated leadership programme in September 2009, to reflect findings from an independent five year study on the current programme.

6.11 Hampshire County Council's Recruitment and Development Team within Education Personnel Services provides support and advice to heads and governors on their recruitment and selection processes, including the provision of advice and practical strategies for schools experiencing difficulties in appointing staff. Targeted support is also provided for areas of need. EPS also manages the Children's Services Department's Recruitment and Development Strategy for Local Authority Support to schools and provides a service to schools and those seeking careers in Hampshire.

7. The story behind the data - so what's the problem?

7.1 In December 2007, Conservative Party claims that teachers were quitting their jobs `in thousands' made headline news. Whilst the Government responded with data indicating that recruitment to the profession was buoyant, the ensuing national conversation suggested that many teachers were becoming disillusioned with their careers. Government red tape, poor discipline in schools and `micromanagement' of teachers were all cited as reasons. A recent study by the National Foundation for Educational Research8 found that the most common concerns among those who had considered a career in teaching were excessive workload, low salaries, a negative image of the teaching profession and long hours. Undergraduates who had not yet decided to become teachers were discouraged by the possibility of dealing with disruptive students, high levels of bureaucracy, a perception that schools lacked adequate funding and concerns about Ofsted inspections.

7.2 The charts at Figure 20 show the destination of teachers leaving full-time service in England, in 1997-8 and 2005-6. In 1989-90, there were 37,100 leavers from full-time teaching in the maintained nursery, primary and secondary sector in England.  By 1998-99, this figure had fallen to 31,000, but has since increased to 39,900 in 2005-06. Between 1997-98 and 2005-06, the number of teachers leaving to go into retirement almost halved. The actual number moving out of service (i.e. career break, other employment) increased by 4,600 over this period.

Figure 20

7.3 Research by the University of Liverpool in 20039 sought to understand the motivations of teachers leaving the profession. Five main factors were found to influence teachers' decisions to leave: workload; new challenge; the school situation; salary; and personal circumstances. Of these, workload was considered most important and salary the least. Leavers tended disproportionately to be either young with a few years' service or older and approaching retirement, to be female, and to come from the shortage subjects. Teachers in London and the south east were more likely to move to other schools and to leave than teachers in the midlands and the north. Over 40% of leavers said that nothing would have induced them to stay. The main changes that would have made a difference to the others were a reduced workload, more support from the school and a higher salary.

7.4 Interestingly, the level of challenge (linguistic/socio-economic or attainment/special educational needs) seems to make very little difference overall to teachers' satisfaction in their job, as demonstrated in responses to the General Teaching Council's 2007 Independent Annual Survey of the Teaching Profession. However, in both primary and secondary schools facing the highest levels of linguistic/socio-economic challenge, teachers were more likely to envisage progressing into leadership and management posts (other than headship) in the upcoming five years than those in schools facing relatively lower levels of challenge.

7.5 In Hampshire, no countywide survey has been carried out to assist with understanding teachers' perceptions of teaching as a career, or to gauge their reasons for leaving the profession. There is also no central way of recording teachers' career aspirations at present. However, a point made by many stakeholders during the review was that data relating to recruitment and retention in schools was incapable of demonstrating the `emotional' picture behind the problem. The scrutiny process was therefore well-placed to dig into these issues. The information in the following sections presented in the evidence as reasons behind recruitment and retention difficulties in Hampshire.

7.6 What's the problem? 1. Proximity to London and the Fringe Area

7.6.1 Data at Annexes C and F of this report show very clearly that certain parts of Hampshire struggle much more than others to recruit and retain teachers. Explanations offered by stakeholders during the course of the review are fairly consistent and point to several key issues. Amongst these, the most frequently quoted is pay. Whilst teacher pay starts well, it fails to accrue as quickly as other professions. Teacher pay in England differs depending on a school's location. In London and the `Fringe Area' (which includes counties bordering Hampshire, such as Surrey and Berkshire), weighted salaries are available. To put this into perspective, as at September 2008 a teacher on the highest point of the main pay scale not receiving any additional allowances earns £30,148. In the Fringe Area, this increases to £31,138, in Outer London to £33,554 and Inner London to £34,768.10 Most stakeholders identified the proximity of jobs with London-weighted salaries as being the greatest barrier to recruitment and retention in Basingstoke and Deane. However, there was also a clear message from stakeholders that any attempts to expand the Fringe Area boundary into Hampshire would not serve to improve the current situation. It was also generally acknowledged that pay is not the overriding factor in a teacher's decision to accept a teaching post: perceptions of how difficult or unenjoyable the work would be are a much greater deterrent.

7.6.2 Evidence from several stakeholders indicates that, with great improvements in teacher pay and conditions over the past few years, salaries of Advanced Skilled Teachers, Excellent teachers or Senior Leaders with Teaching and Learning Responsibility compare favourably with those on the leadership spine. Some senior teachers may therefore not aspire to headship when, for so little extra pay, the burden of responsibility increases so greatly. This view was backed up by evidence from Hampshire's Primary Headteachers Conference.

7.6.3 Connected to the question of pay is the issue of house prices in a County such as Hampshire. Most stakeholders pointed out that mortgages were way beyond the reach of the average NQT and many young teachers. Again, in the north of the County, the lure of additional pay across the border is undeniably strong for this reason. Several stakeholders felt that much more should be done to provide support to teachers early in their career, to assist with housing costs and in paying off student loans.

7.6.4 Interestingly, on January 13 2009, the Government announced proposals in its New Opportunities White Paper for a new package of support to help headteachers attract more of the best teachers into challenging schools, including a £10,000 `golden handcuff' for three years' service. It remains to be seen whether this type of financial incentive will have an impact on Hampshire's recruitment difficulty hotspots in the north of the County.

7.6.5 A further reason offered in the evidence to account for the difficulties in recruiting in the north of the County was the proximity to Surrey which operates 11-18 teaching posts. Members were particularly interested by several comments in the evidence to the effect that local authority areas operating an 11-18 system of education are often more attractive to teachers as they provide greater scope for teachers to develop skills in teaching across a range of age groups and curricula and give access to older pupils who are more motivated to learn. On this latter point, evidence from Hampshire's Secondary Headteachers' Conference acknowledged that the raising of the school leaving age to 18 would dilute this particular advantage of the system. Furthermore, Hampshire's Children's Services Department reminded Members that effective collaborations between schools could achieve the same opportunities to embed flexibility for teachers to work across the full range of school stages. A more in-depth discussion of school collaborations can be found at section 8.3 of this report.

7.7 What's the problem? 2. Perceptions of teaching and school image

7.7.1 Evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel Services points to `unique selling points' as a draw to potential teachers, whether this be the type of school, its specialism or image. Some areas of the County are perceived to be more challenging than others and this can be a deterrent to some teachers. Schools therefore need to be careful in how they market themselves and their area, through the quality of their websites, recruitment campaigns and any other promotional media.

7.7.2 The level of deprivation or disadvantage in a school's environs can be a barrier to effective recruitment and retention. Evidence from NAHT points out that the most significant areas of leadership recruitment difficulty are in areas where the greatest levels of disadvantage exist. It is possible that the Government `golden handcuff' scheme described in section 7.6.4 will help, but evidence from NAHT ponders whether the most outstanding headteachers should be required to work in the most disadvantaged areas, since strong leadership is not only critical in reversing the fortunes of failing schools, but also attractive to potential high quality school employees.

7.7.3 Frequently raised in the evidence is the issue of teaching being seen as a career with poor social image, undervalued by government and the public and with insupportable levels of public accountability. Evidence from one of Hampshire Children's Services Area Directors points to the unfounded criticism and negative image of teachers portrayed in the media as the single most damaging factor affecting the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers. This is a view strongly backed by most stakeholders. With many teaching and school leadership posts already being open to near unbearable levels of public scrutiny and inspection, this added false public accountability (often brought about by parents and politicians taking up issues with the media prior to discussing with the relevant authorities) is hugely detrimental to the profession and a major reason behind teachers' decisions to leave the profession - or not enter it in the first place. The issue is even more pronounced for special school teachers.

7.7.4 Evidence from Education Personnel Services shows that work is being undertaken with schools, particularly in Basingstoke, to address `image' issues affecting recruitment, but most stakeholders felt that more could be done on this point.

7.8 What's the problem? 3. Access and transportation

7.8.1 Whilst pay in the north of the County is a key issue, western areas of the New Forest and Gosport borough both experience greater than average recruitment and retention difficulties. The remoteness and small population of the Forest and transportation issues in Gosport are offered as reasons by the Education Personnel Service.

7.8.2 Evidence from a current serving deputy headteacher in Havant illustrates the lifestyle benefits for teachers in the south of the County. This witness believes that the proximity to the coast is often a reason for staff not wanting to move from the County once they have taken up a position. However, transportation issues pose serious issues. As a female deputy head in Havant with a young family, this stakeholder claimed that the road network in the south of the County made it impossible for her to seek headship positions further than 10 miles away from home. She also claimed that she knows of several other deputies keen to seek headship whose options are limited by poor transport infrastructure and road traffic.

7.9 What's the problem? 4. Accountability, bureaucracy and workload

7.9.1 Amongst stakeholders, one of the most frequently cited challenges in recruitment and retention (particularly for school leadership posts) is increasing levels of accountability and bureaucracy in schools. NAHT evidence suggests that, whilst most headteachers accept that continuous improvement needs to be made, this should be done in an innovative and non-risk-averse climate at school level. The target setting agenda is singled out as a great deterrent by several stakeholders. NAHT comments that `we spend more time measuring the pig rather than feeding it' and believes that this agenda in its current form has done much to contribute to the current recruitment crisis. Evidence from the County Council's Children's Services Department also points out that targets and inspection are not always the most effective way of demonstrating quality in schools. Interestingly, the impact of OFSTED judgements has perverse effects on potential leaders in a school: a poor OFSTED can be a deterrent just as much as an outstanding one, where the pressure of maintaining high standards in a highly visible and accountable role can discourage candidates from applying to leadership posts in strong schools.

7.9.2 OFSTED inspections are a frequently quoted disincentive to potential heads and a demotivator for current school leaders. NAHT points out that a headteacher who starts in role aged 35-40 may face more than six OFSTED inspections in their career. The stress of this experience is viewed as a clear explanation for the early retirement and resignation of many headteachers.

7.9.3 For leadership positions, National College for School Leadership research found that teachers' perceptions of the job of headteacher being too demanding (contrary to perceptions of heads themselves that the job is very rewarding) was a major deterrent to potential school leaders. This contradiction was reinforced in evidence from several witnesses to the review.

7.9.4 An interesting observation was made in evidence from NAHT that some headteachers do not feel they have an ally to turn to for support and advice. Previously, the local authority carried out this role, but with the introduction of greater independence for schools, headteachers can feel beleaguered at times - particularly in situations where relationships between governing bodies and headteachers are less solid. This view was not supported by evidence from headteachers to the review who felt that good support was available from School Improvement Partners, fellow headteachers and from Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College, but Members found the NAHT evidence significant nonetheless.

7.9.5 Adding to the ever-increasing pile of bureaucracy and management activities, the Health and Safety agenda is highlighted as a major frustration. The NAHT believes that the levels of bureaucracy and training required at present are out of proportion to keeping children safe and are a distraction to the headteacher's central role. This comes in addition to a raft of initiatives from the DCSF over the past 15 years or so, which have contributed to a sense of `initiative overload' for teachers and headteachers.

7.9.6 The increased workload brought about by new initiatives and inspection is illustrated in evidence from Hampshire's Teacher Liaison Panel who quote the National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers (NASUWT) 2008 survey of teachers to show that:

7.9.7 Hampshire's Teacher Liaison Panel also demonstrates how many hours of teacher time are lost to administrative tasks and other activities which government workforce remodelling measures were meant to have addressed. This issue is discussed in greater detail in section 8 of this report.

7.10 What's the problem? 5. Pupil behaviour

7.10.1 The issue of pupil behaviour and its management in schools is worthy of a review in its own right. However, it cannot be ignored that this is a major issue impacting on teacher recruitment and retention and staff wellbeing in schools. In its 2007 review of School Exclusions, the Children and Young People Select Committee made several recommendations relating to behaviour support for schools. Monitoring of the Executive Member's response to these recommendations commenced in 2008, with good progress reported. Progress will continue to be monitored by the Select Committee in 2009.

8. The story behind the data - The changing nature of school management

8.1 Possibly the keystone of any plan or strategy to ensure a future teaching workforce is acknowledgement of the fact that the roles of teachers and headteachers are changing. In his foreword to the Training and Development Agency for Schools Strategic Plan 2008-13 Sir Brian Follett states that `The pace of modern society is transforming the role of schools; in addition to their traditional role for education, schools now have far greater responsibility for securing the well-being of all children and young people.' The Government's Every Child Matters and the launch of the Children's Plan in 2007 are shaping how a wide range of services will be delivered in child-centred ways. Initiatives aimed at narrowing the gap between the highest and lowest levels of educational achievement and wellbeing are having a huge impact on schools and their workforce. For example, by 2010, all schools are due to become extended schools, proving access to a range of services for children, their families and the wider community. This, coupled with the impact of 14-19 reforms, means that a school's role as the coordinator and leader of a range of professionals and organisations in an area is a vastly more complex role than the traditional role of educator.

8.2 The changing nature of school management - Workforce reforms

8.2.1 Of particular significance to this review is the impact of workforce reforms in schools. As described in the previous paragraph, schools must now carry out a dual role: firstly to ensure consistent, high-quality teaching and learning, and secondly to ensure effective integrated working with partners in an area. This means that the nature of the workforce needs to change. The 2003 National Workforce Agreement introduced measures to raise standards and tackle unacceptable levels of workload for teachers. To achieve this it introduced a series of significant changes to teachers' conditions of service which were introduced in three annual phases from September 2003. These were:

8.2.2 These changes were intended to allow teachers to focus on teaching and learning while their work is supplemented by a range of support roles that the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) - together with schools and local authorities - has helped to develop. These roles include the Higher Level Teaching Assistant (HLTA). Advice in the TDA School Workforce Strategy guides school leaders to make the best use of these roles not only to improve standards of teaching and learning but also to assist with managing the work-life balance of school leaders. The TDA has conducted a review of National Occupational Standards in order to create a pathway for all those who support teaching and learning in schools. Formal accreditation for non-teachers is available in the form of the `Support Work in Schools' (SWiS) qualification which is aimed at support staff who are less directly involved in teaching and learning.

8.2.3 In designing the school workforce for the future, the TDA works in conjunction with other bodies such as the National College for School Leadership. NCSL has recognised that traditional models of school leadership are unlikely to suffice in the face of the challenges posed by of new ways of working in schools and has therefore carried out research into a range of new models of headship that have particular relevance to leadership succession. These include federations, co-headship and executive headship. The use of these models of headship is intended to open up career opportunities and pathways for other staff to have a `taster' of leadership, in addition to addressing new challenges posed by the need for schools to collaborate with partners in their areas and address shortages of school teachers and leaders.

8.2.4 Despite the TDA's enthusiasm at the positive impact workforce reform should make, evidence from several stakeholders - and most notably the National Association of Headteachers - points out that tangible outcomes have yet to be seen. NAHT particularly highlight the fact that levels of administrative support in schools are often determined at local level and agreed on the basis of `what has always been done' rather than what is required. This view is backed up in evidence from Hampshire's Teacher Liaison Panel which refers to the results of a Hampshire survey indicating that a number of schools have failed to implement the changes. The TLP suggests that the County Council may need to take on a greater role in monitoring implementation of workforce reforms and points out that the government is expected to give local authorities the responsibility of reporting non-compliance with the regulations from 2009. NAHT suggests that governing bodies should be trained more thoroughly on this particular issue and be required to address it as part of their responsibility for overseeing headteachers' work-life balance.

8.2.5 Evidence from Hampshire Teacher Liaison Panel advises that schools which have not applied remodelling changes are more likely to lose NQTs for reason of `overwork' than those school which have applied them. The TLP suggests that an NQT who compares their workload with friends in industry may feel indignant at having to work harder for less money.

8.2.6 Evidence from a focus group of Reading University PGCE students seems to support this view. These students felt that ongoing mentoring and extra PPA (planning, preparation and assessment) time were the two most important factors in supporting them in their future teaching careers.

8.2.7 Hampshire's Education Personnel Service agrees that, whilst work is underway to trial new models of leadership and other workforce models, more could be done. Evidence from several quarters - and particularly from Hampshire Teacher Liaison Panel - advocates prioritising workforce reform in Hampshire as a great aid to the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers. The TLP believes that, by making Hampshire a beacon of good practice in staff welfare, both through implementation of the reforms and through provision of good training and development, would be a huge draw to teachers. The TLP also suggests that more innovative thinking around workforce reforms could be undertaken in Hampshire including , for example, consideration of accommodating `gap years' in teachers' careers. The TLP described how Steiner Schools currently achieve this by requiring a teacher to educate a cohort of students through each stage of their formal education in order to qualify them for a gap year at the end of the period.

8.3 The changing nature of school management - Collaboration and new models of leadership

8.3.1 A major change for school managers is the need for schools to collaborate with each other and with other organisations in their area. Developments such as the 14-19 curriculum have led to the need for staff at all levels within a school to work with partners. Headteachers are now required to undertake a range of cross-boundary leadership activities with governors, the community, and local and national agencies. As a result of this, many of the more `traditional' roles of the headteacher have now been delegated to lower levels of school management. This situation opens up some excellent opportunities to devise innovative approaches to school leadership, address teacher vacancies and provide the chance for staff to have a taste of leadership and build experience in a range of roles.

8.3.2 However, evidence from NCSL also indicates that the impact of new ways of working (interaction with other services for example) is currently seen by many teachers as a deterrent to seeking headship since it adds further pressure to an already difficult role.11

8.3.3 Some stakeholders indicated that collaborations between Hampshire schools are few and far between and, even where they do exist, can be ineffective due to the natural instinct for schools and governing bodies to compete with each other to keep the best staff and resources. It was recognised, however, that it was vital for schools to work harder at achieving effective collaborations in order to address workforce shortages and deliver the best outcomes for children in Hampshire schools. Evidence also pointed to the fact that collaboration would be critical in delivering the 14-19 curriculum, as well as the Inclusion and Aiming for Disabled Children agendas, therefore making collaboration between primary, secondary and special schools an issue of utmost importance.

8.3.4 Examples of good collaboration in Hampshire were presented in Hampshire's Education Personnel Services' evidence which showed how Basingstoke schools were taking a very collaborative approach to address their vacancies. The schools are looking at methods such as sharing `shortage' subject teachers between schools in an area. This has already been achieved to cover IT lessons in some Basingstoke schools. The new models of headship are also under serious consideration.

8.3.5 Further evidence of the effectiveness of more flexible leadership models and school collaboration was presented by Brune Park Community College. The headteacher at Brune Park has implemented a range of approaches to giving middle and senior leaders tastes of senior leadership and headship, through secondments and rotations of responsibilities within the school. This very much supports the findings of NCSL research which shows that teachers who have tried aspects of headship - and the earlier the better - are more positive about taking on the role.12 Brune Park claims that this approach helps to retain staff for longer until they are ready for a secure move to a promoted post in middle or senior management. Brune Park's headteacher acknowledged that his approach to staff development was helped by the sheer size of the school and the resources available to it. However, he also pointed out that a similar effect can be achieved when smaller schools collaborate with others to share staff, resources and training opportunities. Evidence from Hampshire's Primary Headteachers' Conference sees even greater benefits from adopting more flexible approaches to school leadership and collaboration: they assert that, by developing a range of opportunities around and beyond headship such as secondments and placements, the job may look more attractive to younger candidates who may currently be deterred by the thought of headship being `the end of the line' in their career.

8.3.6 Hampshire's Education Personnel Services are producing a document outlining all the different types of leadership that schools will need to consider in future. This will be an aid to both school leaders and governing bodies in planning the workforce for the future. Over the past two years, much work has already been undertaken by EPS to build understanding and practical consideration of new models of headship amongst school governing bodies and governors are encouraged to discuss options openly with schools' leadership teams to meet recruitment, retention and sustainability needs of a particular school. HCC Governor Services accepted that closer working with School Improvement Partners could also be of benefit in helping to implement more flexible workforce solutions in schools.

8.3.7 Suggestions for how collaboration could be used to address teacher shortages included seconding secondary heads to primary schools (where the impact of headteacher vacancies is due to be greater). Not only could this help address vacancies, but it could also have a positive effect on supporting pupils in the transition from primary to secondary school. Issues raised in section 7.6.5 of this report about the attractiveness to some teachers of the 11-18 system of education can also be addressed through greater school collaboration.

8.3.8 Evidence from a current serving deputy headteacher suggested that governors need to be educated further on the acceptability of `flatter' staffing structures for providing suitable candidates for headship. Having experienced a headteacher recruitment process, this deputy was aware of attitudes amongst governors that several years' deputy headship was an absolute prerequisite for headship. With the roles of head and deputy becoming evermore intertwined, coupled with the changing requirements for effective school leadership, this witness felt that such convictions needed to be broken down to ensure a flow of quality headteachers with appropriate skills.

9. The story behind the data - The role of Governing Bodies

9.1 Governing bodies have a key role in recruiting the workforce, succession planning, and in promoting and supporting teacher development and wellbeing. Governors also have a critical responsibility to ensure quality within their schools.

9.2 Evidence shows that the impact of good school leadership in ensuring quality cannot be underestimated. Good headteachers can raise levels of achievement in schools in relatively short periods of time. It is therefore vital that governing bodies are aware of quality issues in their school's leadership. Whilst major inspection and performance review is undertaken by Ofsted, Hampshire Inspection and Advisory Service and School Improvement Partners, governing bodies have a role in ensuring that no `nasty surprises' arise from these inspections. The governing body's ability to assess performance effectively in its own right is therefore paramount.

9.3 The quality of governing bodies is as much a factor as the quality of the headteacher and standards vary from one governing body to the next. There is a tendency for good schools to have good governing bodies, and vice versa. Indeed, it is quite usual for a poorly achieving school to have governor vacancies, including Chair of Governors. Evidence from Hampshire Governor Services points out that, regardless of the quantity and quality of advice, training and support available to governing bodies, there is very little that can be done if a governing body does not have the time or inclination to engage.

9.4 Evidence from several stakeholders indicates that governing bodies need to become more proactive at taking action and escalating matters when there is a performance or leadership issue in the school. Given that the quality of a headteacher has a huge impact on the outcomes for a school, members were interested to know how easy it was for governing bodies to tackle underperformance in school management. Hampshire Governor Services explained that it is very difficult to dispose of poor leaders, although Hampshire has a good record in turning schools around where they have been deemed to be failing.

9.5 The importance of good performance management frameworks in assisting governing bodies to monitor performance is clear in the evidence. Hampshire Secondary Headteachers' Conference states that, whilst some schools have robust performance management systems, others have `no idea'. This may well be a barrier to the governing body's ability to ensure quality in a school.

9.6 Many stakeholders saw the School Improvement Partner (SIP) as being the key to ensuring quality in schools and tackling underperformance at the earliest opportunity. Taking an overview of schools within a defined area, SIPs visit schools annually, observe teaching practice and discuss with the headteacher any issues and key targets for the school. SIPS also provide the link between the local authority, headteachers and governing bodies in undertaking the school performance management process. A good relationship between a school and their SIP is vital to make schools feel comfortable in asking for help when needed. However, caution was expressed that a SIP should not be attached to a school for too long a period (no more than 3 years was advised by Hampshire Governors' Association) to guard against the SIP-headteacher relationship becoming too `friendly' and losing its critical element of positive challenge.

9.7 A further cause for concern for governing bodies arising in the evidence related to the fact that, whilst the quality of teachers and headteachers presenting for interview was generally still high, the pool of candidates - particularly for leadership posts and in primary and special schools - is shrinking. A reduced choice can make it more difficult for governing bodies to find a match for their person specification, leading to many incidences where roles have to be readvertised, or left unfilled due to a lack of appropriate candidates. Evidence from the National Association of Headteachers shows that, in 2007, 35% of primary, 19% of secondary and 33% of special school posts failed to appoint first time round. Whilst this is an issue in itself, the evidence shows that some governing bodies feel pressurised to make appointments to avoid vacancies. This can result in inappropriate placements, which can be to the detriment of both the teacher and the school.

9.8 Evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel indicates that this situation could be assisted if schools and the local authority worked more effectively together to plan for any upcoming vacancies. At present there is no failsafe system for identifying future vacancies and EPS very much relies on schools advising them of upcoming vacancies on an ad hoc basis.

9.9 In order to attract high quality candidates, the School Teachers Pay and Conditions Document allows governing bodies to use recruitment and retention incentives and benefits. These include the right for governing bodies to provide payments, financial assistance, support or benefits as part of a recruitment or retention package. No data exists centrally in Hampshire to show how schools apply these benefits as such decisions are very much subject to local discretion. However, evidence from one of Hampshire's Area Directors for Children's Services and from Hampshire Governors' Association explains that, without some additional money in their budgets, no school is able to make more than a limited use of these points and both heads & governing bodies struggle with the equity issues that limited use creates. There is also no convincing evidence of the true effectiveness of such benefits in Hampshire.

9.10 Hampshire Governor Services provides information, advice, support and training to school governors in Hampshire. In addition to face-to-face training, a range of support for governors is available on HCC's website and in support packs. Tailor-made training is available for governing bodies with a headship appointment to make in addition to a programme of training for regular recruitment and training. HGS and Education Personnel Services work closely to deliver governor training programmes, therefore ensuring a consistent approach to advising schools on recruitment and retention practice. In 2007-8 1026 governors attended events run by HGS and feedback from witnesses to this review showed great appreciation for the quality of this support, although several stakeholders felt that more needed to be done to address issues with governors having to travel (and pay travelling expenses) to access training at present.

9.11 Finally, evidence from Hampshire Governors' Association demonstrated how the school governor role has become increasingly difficult in the last ten years. A position as chair of governors is usually considered to be an almost full-time job, therefore meaning that retired or self-employed people are often the only suitable candidates. The recruitment of parent governors at infant and primary level is notoriously difficult as parent governors move on when their child leaves the school. These factors can be to the detriment of the quality of the governing body, although Members were encouraged by the views of some stakeholders showing how school collaborations may be able to address this issue. Further information about school collaborations can be found in section 8.3 of this report.

10. The story behind the data - The impact of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) and the Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT) year

10.1 In order to teach in a maintained school, teachers are normally required to have qualified teacher status (QTS). There are two main routes to achieving QTS in England and Wales: through successful completion of an undergraduate course of initial teacher training, or successful completion of a course leading to a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).  Employment-based routes are teacher training programmes that allow trainees to work in a school and follow an individual training programme leading to qualified teacher status. The school pays the trainee as an unqualified teacher.

10.2 The Graduate and Registered Teacher Programmes (GRTP) are employment-based routes to QTS.  They are considered particularly suitable for more mature people with some experience in teaching, or having gained experience in other areas of work and now want to move into teaching.

10.3 The impact of initial teacher training and the NQT year is extremely important in influencing individuals' decisions to pursue a teaching career. A national piece of research13 has shown some interesting variations in the motivations of NQTs from different training routes. Notable highlights include:

10.4 NQTs from all types of ITT are recruited in Hampshire for their NQT year, with many coming from training providers in the area. Evidence from Southampton University's Secondary PGCE Programme Director showed that 50% of the PGCE cohort takes up employment within the Southampton University partnership which includes schools in Hampshire, west Wiltshire, Southampton, Portsmouth, Dorset, Bournemouth, Poole and the Isle of Wight. Students taking up work outside of the partnership often cite family reasons or a need to `spread their wings' in metropolitan areas.

10.5 To assure the quality in the workforce, NQTs are assessed termly against national core standards. A random sample of 15% of Hampshire schools are also moderated by a Hampshire Inspection and Advisory Service (HIAS) inspector every year in order to ascertain the levels of compliance with national standards and support the school in inducting their NQTs.

10.6 It is widely acknowledged that the overall quality of NQTs in England and Hampshire is high. However, evidence from Education Personnel Services indicates that the widening gap between quality candidates and those who are deemed unsuitable to teach in Hampshire is a concern.

10.7 With regard to retention, data about NQTs who dropped out of their NQT year in Hampshire, by age, gender and training route (PGCE, GTP etc.) can be found at Annexe G. Retention of NQTs in Hampshire is around 70% and Education Personnel Services has targeted NQT recruitment in recent years' campaigns, bringing the annual NQT recruitment figure up from 600 to 700 in the past five years. Further evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel Services shows that in Hampshire 92% of NQTs stay into their second year, 75% into their 3rd year, 68% into their fourth year, 59% into their fifth year and 56% into their sixth year. This is in line with national averages.

10.8 A recent publication from the National Foundation for Educational Research14 found that the following reasons seemed to contribute to students' withdrawal from ITT:

10.9 Hampshire schools and the local authority are aware of the need to address unrealistic perceptions of teaching and a range of support is available to NQTs in this respect. In order to provide potential trainee teachers with realistic experiences of life as a teacher, Hampshire County Council offers the Open Schools programme and a variety of taster courses. The Open Schools programme is designed for those at the early stages of thinking about a career in teaching and offers the chance for potential teachers to spend time observing a day in a school. Three day taster courses, including a one day placement, are designed to help people decide whether to apply for ITT.

10.10 In order to address workload issues, universities have developed resources to facilitate training in certain subjects. For example, Southampton University has developed specialist facilities to address the fact that science candidates are required to enhance their specialist single-science background to teach integrated sciences in schools. Extended 18 or 24 month PGCEs aimed at turning non-specialists into specialists for Maths and Science courses are now available and have shown good recruitment to date, particularly for Maths.

10.11 With regard to the other reasons for NQT withdrawal outlined in 6.6 above, the National College for School Leadership's publication Growing Your Leaders underlines the importance of continuing professional development for new and trainee teachers. The findings of the study showed that schools which prioritise professional development `have strengths in induction, mentoring, tutoring, peer training and coaching[...] They are a rich environment for initial teacher training and work collaboratively with Higher Education and other schools in providing placements'.

10.12 Evidence from the Hampshire Secondary School Teachers' Conference demonstrates that, in order to provide trainees with the support they deserve, schools need to have a high level of professional practice. Brune Park Community College has implemented a full `training school' infrastructure using senior staff with specific roles to deliver a comprehensive programme of training, support and development for ITT and NQTs. This system has improved recruitment at NQT level, although it is acknowledged that such a system would be less feasible in a smaller school with fewer resources. The need for schools in an area to collaborate and share resources is apparent in this respect.

10.13 A key barrier to achieving good support and mentoring for NQTs is highlighted in evidence from Southampton University. Shortages of teachers in subjects such as Maths and Science mean that there are difficulties in finding mentors for NQTs in these subject areas. Work is being undertaken to find solutions to this problem through partnering with schools, but this still presents as a key issue in supporting students and NQTs in the early years of their careers. Most stakeholders agreed that there was a need to identify and develop talent from the earliest possible stage and so this presents as a key issue.

10.14 As part of their information gathering, members heard evidence from an NQT at Wildern School. Members were enormously impressed with the evident quality and enthusiasm of this witness whose views on a teaching career in Hampshire were extremely encouraging. This NQT had opted for the GTP training route and had a very positive experience of both his initial teacher training and NQT year. This witness's evidence corroborated much of the evidence evaluated by the review group - for example, that high house prices in Hampshire and levels of paperwork and administration for school leaders were seen as drawbacks to a career in teaching. However, some other points were raised which were of particular interest to Members. These are summarised in the following paragraphs.

10.15 On the topic of financial incentives, Members tested the idea of `golden handcuffs' (whereby a teacher would have to work in Hampshire schools for a certain period in exchange for financial incentives). This witness did not view this as a barrier to career progression due to the size of the County and the diversity of schools within it. Financial assistance in the form of help with student loan repayments was considered to be attractive, but would not be the overriding factor in deciding where to work.

10.16 Continuing professional development was considered extremely important and this NQT had received excellent training and mentoring at both Wildern and at a previous school. Most of the training he receives is Wildern's own schemes and the witness was not aware of any schemes provided by the local authority. Indeed, the role of the local authority in general remained something of a mystery to this witness at this point in his career!

10.17 This NQT had clear career aspirations for leadership but was unsure of the career path for achieving this. That said, he acknowledged the critical importance of the support he received from a range of `inspirational' deputy headteachers at Wildern who were assisting with his development.

10.18 The challenges of poor behaviour were seen to be `part of the job'. This NQT said that behavioural challenges would not put him off pursuing teaching as a career as the perks of the job and the interaction with colleagues and pupils make the work enjoyable. The idea of working in a more deprived area or a more challenging school with lower attainment rates was not seen to be a deterrent. He took a philosophical view that, whereas the challenge in a high achieving school may be in raising C grades to A grades, in other schools the challenge will be achieving any C grades at all. He views these challenges as similar in this respect and believes that he would find the challenge of a lower achieving school stimulating.

10.19 In response to questions from Members about teaching in special schools, he responded that it was unusual to see a male Special Educational Needs Coordinator in his school, suggesting that SEN support is a career more attractive to women (as the profile of the workforce seems to confirm). However, he would consider a role in any type of school if it was a sound career move.

10.20 Finally, Members were interested by references to `informal' recruitment practices being used by schools to target NQTs. This `tap on the shoulder' technique can be flattering to NQTs who may be concerned about securing their first job, but may lead to inappropriate placements in schools which then bring about retention issues later.

11. What is being done to tackle recruitment and retention issues in Hampshire?

11.1 Evidence from stakeholders shows that Hampshire is ahead of the game in many ways in tackling recruitment and retention issues. EPS is confident that it will be able to ensure the quality of the teaching workforce in Hampshire, but admits that the volumes of vacancies the County faces will be a challenge to schools and the EPS team, which is already operating a full capacity. Evidence from the National Association of Headteachers indicates that local authorities will become the major recruitment agent for schools in the next few years and so pressure on this service looks set to increase.

11.2 What is being done - Recruitment strategies

11.2.1 In addition to press and internet advertising, various methods to recruit teachers have been tried by Hampshire's Education Personnel Services, from working with advertising agencies, sending messages to parents of existing pupils encouraging qualified teachers back to work, to attempts to engage local MPs. More innovative approaches - such as sharing teachers between schools - have been considered and the importance of high levels of school collaboration has been recognised by the Education Personnel Service. Incentives offered to Hampshire teachers in addition to those available nationally include ongoing professional development, childcare vouchers, benefits relating to housing and legal advice and access to a free counselling and support service.

11.2.2 Teachers from overseas are sometimes able to fill vacancies, although there are issues with overseas teachers not wanting to stay in one job, or indeed country, for any lengthy period. Recruitment from overseas is becoming more prevalent and Hampshire's Preferred Supply Agencies are working with Hampshire to attract appropriately skilled and qualified overseas teachers. In order to address shortages in the Basingstoke area, a representative for Basingstoke schools visited Australia in 2008 to recruit teachers, particularly those trained in English, Maths and Science. There were mixed views amongst stakeholders about this approach to recruitment, with one pointing out that, with the enormous culture difference between the UK and other countries - particularly in terms of red tape, regulation and inspection - teachers from abroad are likely to find the system too rigid and punitive, prompting them to leave after a short period in the UK.

11.2.3 The Education Personnel Service has undertaken visits to universities to promote teaching in Hampshire, although the evidence suggests that a greater profile at university recruitment fairs may help. In high vacancy areas, such as Basingstoke and Deane, school headteachers are currently working together to promote Basingstoke to potential recruits.

11.2.4 EPS is increasingly assisting schools with recruitment of support posts and working closely with Governor Services to improve interviewing and selection training. It also works closely with Children's Centres to assist with recruitment issues. EPS and Hampshire Governor Services provide a range of training and briefing for schools and governing bodies, depending on schools' needs. There is much focus on recruitment and retention practices: for example, several EPS staff have been trained by the National College for School Leadership on Safer Recruitment and are now able to train all Hampshire schools on this topic.

11.2.5 The general feeling amongst those involved in teacher recruitment is that every effort is being made to attract teachers, but the normal strategies are not working. Whilst most stakeholders concurred that much is being done to address recruitment and retention, a question was raised as to whether too much emphasis is currently being given to recruitment of headteachers at the expense of retaining teachers. Hampshire's Teacher Liaison Panel also felt that a greater focus was required on establishing teachers' reasons for leaving their posts in Hampshire. The TLP proposed that better use of exit interviews, for example, could start to build a picture of where greater support and intervention is needed to keep teachers in post.

11.2 What is being done - Continuing Professional Development and grooming of future school leaders

11.2.1 The National College for School Leadership's publication Leadership Succession: An Overview addresses the looming shortage of headteachers in England and proposes new systematic approaches to succession planning, to replace the ad hoc methods of the past. The point is made that no one agency or partner alone can address issues associated with succession planning and that consideration of this needs to be made by headteachers, governors, schools and local authorities, as well as other partners at local and national level.

11.2.2 The General Teaching Council's (GTC's) 2007 Survey of Teachers focused, amongst other things, on teachers' career plans and the provision and uptake of professional development opportunities by teachers in England. Overall conclusions from the survey claimed that the results `do little to allay the concerns about retention within the teaching profession. The findings point to the challenges of retention per se, and also suggest that a number of teachers may be disillusioned in their current employment. In view of the importance of these issues and the value to children's education of promoting high levels of job satisfaction among teachers, it would seem crucial to take account of the trends reported here, as well as the reasons for the possible disaffection of some members of the teaching profession.' Given that the survey points to continuing professional development as a key contributor to teacher job satisfaction, this conclusion adds pressure to schools and local authorities to provide the best possible development opportunities for teaching staff.

11.2.3 The GTC survey questioned teachers about their perceptions of their ongoing professional development. Professional development is considered a top priority in ensuring the development of professional expertise, skills and confidence in order to raise standards of learning and further school improvement. Examples of effective professional development could include the following:

11.2.4 Results from the GTC survey showed that 30% of teachers felt that their professional development needs had been met fully over the past 12 months; 53% felt that they had been met to some extent; and 17% felt that their needs had not been met.

11.2.5 Among those teachers whose professional development needs were not being met were higher proportions of men than women, teachers aged 30-49 and secondary school teachers. Amongst those who felt that their needs had been met were higher proportions of teachers with 3-5 years' service.

11.2.6 The most common reasons why teachers felt that their professional development needs had not been met were that they were not offered the opportunity to attend sessions, there was a lack of funding, or a shortage of time to attend. Other reasons included courses being irrelevant, or based on topics with which teachers were already familiar, or that the courses were designed for the school's needs and not the teacher's.

11.2.7 The Training and Development Agency's 2008-13 Strategic Plan states that, of equal importance to the need to attract high quality applicants to the teaching profession is the requirement to ensure all those working with children in schools are able to develop their skills and practice to meet the needs and aspirations of children and young people. Continuing Professional Development is critical to developing a workforce which is fit-for-purpose to serve schools and the wider community. The Government's `New Professionalism' agenda is based on the concept that teachers' commitment to the development of their pupils should be matched by commitment to their own and other teachers' development as part of their professional identity.

11.2.8 The National College of School Leadership's publication Growing Your Leaders asserts that schools which prioritise professional development `have strengths in induction, mentoring, tutoring, peer training and coaching[...] They are a rich environment for initial teacher training and work collaboratively with Higher Education and other schools in providing placements'.

11.2.9 Recruitment and retention of quality staff and a focus on succession planning are both important elements of Hampshire County Council's Success Through People strategy 2005-10. The HCC Human Resources Service Plan 2007-9 contains a key action to develop and pilot a standard succession planning framework, part of which is a formal framework across schools that will support overall talent management, identify `critical' resourcing areas objectively and provide solutions to mitigate resourcing risks. A specific action on developing headteachers is also included in the HR Service Plan, which was rolled out in March 2008.

11.2.10 As a local authority, Hampshire has taken the identification and training of future school leaders very seriously indeed. The County is a member of various Training and Development Agency for Schools networks, one of which is the Future Leaders Innovations Group - a group of local authorities charged with identifying the characteristics and requirements of future school leaders. A key message emerging from the work undertaken by the Group so far is that potential leaders must be primed for leadership at the earliest stage - ideally from initial teacher training. Kent and West Sussex County Councils are two of Hampshire's partners in the Group.

11.2.11 Following oral evidence from the National College for School Leadership, Members were left with no doubt that Hampshire's approach to developing school leaders was very much on track and ahead of the game nationally. Written evidence from previous participants on Hampshire leadership development programmes backed up this view, with one current deputy headteacher stating that her participation in the Future Change Makers programme inspired her to seek out headship. A key aspect of Hampshire's approach has been the development of a set of `values' which describe the personal qualities and behaviours school leaders are expected to demonstrate. These values make explicit what leadership looks like in practice and address the often difficult-to-quantify `emotional' aspects of teaching and leadership.

11.2.12 Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College's (HTLC) leadership development programmes aim to tackle negative perceptions of school leadership and aim to build capacity, raise aspirations and ensure long-term succession planning strategies are put in place for Hampshire schools. These aims address issues arising from National College for School Leadership research15 which points to the following as key aspects to address in effective succession planning:

11.2.13 Hampshire's framework for developing future school leaders consists of six key projects. The content and purpose of these schemes are summarised below.

11.2.14 Future Change Makers: this is a programme for deputy headteachers, assistant headteachers and senior teachers - anyone who is open to the possibility of becoming a headteacher but may currently be lacking in confidence. The programme is facilitated by HTLC with high profile keynote speakers and experienced headteachers. The programme focuses on Every Child Matters, community and leadership, the learning-centred school, leading and coaching. The sessions are facilitated by experienced headteachers and the programme also involves intersessional tasks and coaching.

11.2.15 An evaluation of the Future Change Makers Programme was undertaken in December 2007. This was a positive review and several points for further development are being addressed by HTLC to improve the programme further.

11.2.16 Information showing the delegate profiles for the Future Change Makers programme shows that men are more likely than women to present for leadership training, as data at Figure 21 shows.

Male

Female

Total

PRIMARY

5

13

18

SECONDARY

7

1

8

SPECIAL

1

1

TOTALS

12

15

27

11.2.17 However, the programme has attracted a good spread of age-groups and teachers with different lengths of service:

Primary/special

Secondary

Overall

Less than 5 years

1

1

5 - 8 years

6

2

8

8 - 12 years

6

4

10

12 years +

6

2

8

11.2.18 Leadership Development Centre: the LDC is a unique provision in Hampshire and is the result of collaboration between headteachers, local authority officers and the National College for School Leadership. The LDC was previously focused on teachers at deputy head level, helping them to develop the required skills to achieve headship. The first pilot of this scheme appeared to be successful and the student effort and HCC investment in the programme contributed to this success. Formal evaluations of the scheme show that 100% of participants believed that it impacted on their leadership learning in ways other types of learning have not. The LDC has now broadened to capture senior school managers below the level of deputy head. From February 2009 an LDC for middle leaders is being introduced which aims to target younger teachers and raise aspirations for leadership in schools. Future plans include an expansion of the scheme to support staff and governors. The number of delegates on the LDC is limited to multiples of six, up to a maximum of 18 due to the cost of providing the course and the high levels of administrative support required.

11.2.19 Aiming High: raising aspirations: this programme consists of a range of events aimed at raising the aspirations of groups including NQTs, teachers returning to the profession after a career break, fast-tracker teachers, middle leaders and governors. As part of this project a DVD has been produced showing the positive aspects of headship as a career. This DVD has been very well-received.

11.2.20 Talent Management System: this project focuses on improving Hampshire's systems for identifying and developing leadership potential. Its main aims are:

11.2.21 There are two facets to the TMS: the Open Access Pool and the Managed Pool. The Open Access Pool aims to open up the flow of communication to school staff about the jobs, events and other information that are available that will help them to develop their leadership potential. The TMS is linked to National standards and Hampshire's school leadership competencies and provides an opportunity for staff to assess themselves against these.

11.2.22 The Managed Pool is designed to increase delegates' skills, knowledge and confidence with Management and Leadership and create an understanding of emotional intelligence and the benefits to using this in all aspects of their role. The scheme also aims to develop deeper understanding of leading in and across schools, working in a multi agency environment and with other government departments.

11.2.23 The programme ensures that delegates receive recognition since they will need to have been identified via a sponsorship process. Those selected for the managed pool of the talent management system may have the opportunity to realise further opportunities for development by way of projects and assignments.

11.2.24 For the purposes of the TMS pilot, applications were considered from aspiring headteachers who had obtained, or were planning to obtain, the National Professional Qualification for Headteachers, as well as experienced headteachers who were looking for opportunities for further development. Following the pilot, it is hoped that the TMS will be open to leaders at all levels - within teaching and support roles - who wish to develop further.

11.2.25 The Department for Children Schools and Families' National Professional Qualification for Headteachers (NPQH) is to become compulsory by 2009. The Hampshire Talent Management System has been designed to align with the new methods of assessment for the NPQH.

11.2.26 The TMS should help to target potential school leaders at an earlier stage in their career. Participation in the TMS can grant teachers a place on the LDC at a later stage. Over 100 hundred teachers have been tracked by the TMS so far, although the system still relies on updates from schools and individuals to keep information up-to-date. The identification of talent within schools depends heavily on the effectiveness of school performance management systems. Evidence to the review indicates that these systems are not always adequate, often due to a lack of time to keep them updated.

11.2.27 Collaboration, Innovation, Communication Project: this suite of 5 collaborative area projects aims to develop leadership qualities and behaviours through coaching, job swaps at deputy headteacher level, middle leadership programmes, and focusing on nurturing talent in its early stages. The programme works on the premise that school leaders can be `home-grown' to the benefit of all schools in an area.

11.2.28 Fundamental aspects of all HTLC's training and development programmes are coaching, networking, collaboration and mentoring - all essential elements in developing modern school leaders. Feedback from the schemes shows that having access to an experienced mentor is a vital part of an aspiring leader's development. Indeed this is a view backed up in evidence from a current headteacher in a Hampshire school who claimed that, whilst the knowledge and confidence she developed through her participation on Hampshire's Leadership Development Centre and during her National Professional Qualification for Headteachers was very important, the key to her success in becoming a headteacher in a relatively short timescale was the support of her previous headteacher who embraced opportunities for his deputies to take on a range of leadership and management responsibility and gain relevant experience for headship.

11.2.29 The evidence shows that mentoring and coaching are critical to developing future school leaders. Experienced school leaders in the late stages of their careers, or retired, appear to be an invaluable resource for addressing retention and quality issues in schools in this respect. Hampshire already employs over 100 headteachers as school advisers and School Improvement Partners and some good practice in mentoring and coaching exists within individual schools. However, many stakeholders suggested that more could be done to target existing headteachers to ascertain whether they would be prepared to dedicate some of their time (either alongside a current job, or in retirement) to provide coaching and mentoring support to other schools and individuals. Evidence from the NAHT suggested that many serving headteachers would value the opportunity to undertake new part time roles, maybe leaving their deputies to gain experience of leadership in the process. Whilst Hampshire has made excellent progress in tapping into this resource (by using headteacher facilitators on the Future Change Makers programme for example), the need for Hampshire to become better at capturing information about all those headteachers who would be willing to assist in such a way was stressed by many witnesses.

11.2.30 Whilst there was a great deal of support amongst stakeholders for HTLC's development programmes, a couple of issues were highlighted which were of interest to members. Firstly, in order to target the most appropriate candidates, the scheme relies greatly on schools drawing it to the attention of teachers. Several stakeholders felt that further investment and roll-out of the HTLC's schemes would be greatly beneficial. Indeed, in evidence from Hampshire Secondary Headteachers' Conference, it was claimed that a future school leadership crisis could be entirely averted using current resources, through greater investment in HTLC programmes and by increasing flexibility of movement of headteachers and senior school leaders between schools.

11.2.31 Secondly, Members felt that more could be done to identify and target teachers who fell within the under-represented demographic groups identified in section 3 of this report such as women with leadership potential, male primary teachers, and teachers in the 30-45 age groups. HTLC acknowledged this as a key issue to address but also made clear that very little evidence exists either nationally or locally to describe the development needs of these demographic groups.

11.2.32 In order to demonstrate the value of HTLC's programmes, Members suggested that more work needed to be done to collect information on outcomes and success stories ensuing from participation on HTLC courses and that more thorough evaluation should be undertaken. Members also proposed that further work by the County Council in articulating the desired strategic outcomes of the various programmes would be helpful. HTLC acknowledged that further work was required in this area.

11.2.33 Finally, Evidence from HTLC showed the importance of continued funding from Hampshire's Schools Forum for Hampshire's leadership development programmes. The programmes are currently heavily subsidised by HTLC and the Schools Forum money is critical to the schemes' future success.

12. Specific issues for Special Schools

12.1 It must be stressed that most issues in recruiting and retaining high quality teachers and headteachers apply equally to mainstream schools as to special schools and so the evidence presented in the main body of this report is of equal importance in this context. Special schools are an integral part of education provision in Hampshire and have therefore been considered `in the round' in this report. However, the review group wished to highlight certain specific issues arising both in the written and oral evidence, and in discussions during a visit to a Hampshire special school.

12.2 Annexes D and E show that special schools demonstrate higher vacancy rates across the board when compared with primary and secondary schools.

12.3 Evidence from Hampshire's Special Heads Conference also makes clear that recruitment is a major issue for special schools in the north of the County where London-weighted salaries are available just across the border in Surrey.

12.4 The number of pupils with statements of SEN has fallen slightly over the last 7 years, mostly in maintained mainstream schools, while the number of children for whom a statement is issued for the first time increased in 2008 for the first time in 10 years.  Over two-thirds of children issued with statements of SEN for the first time are now attending mainstream schools, although this proportion has fallen over the last few years.

12.5 Special schools are working increasingly in partnership with mainstream schools, and many pupils with SEN are choosing to attend mainstream schools. The implications for those who take on leadership and management roles in special schools are therefore significant. Nationally, the future of special schools in both the maintained and non-maintained sectors is debated as questions are posed as to whether school leaders should continue to provide a distinct educational experience for pupils in special schools or whether they should seek to develop new roles within the mainstream.

12.6 In Hampshire, much has been done to clarify the role of special schools in the County's SEN and Inclusion Policies. Evidence from the Special School Representative to the review group claimed that both policies are very clear in outlining the functions and responsibilities of special schools in Hampshire. However, some arguments suggest that special schools should increasingly cater for the growing population of children with severe and complex needs. This point was suggested in evidence from several stakeholders, including Hampshire Teacher Liaison Panel who felt that children with complex needs were suffering as a result of children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD) being placed in Multiple Learning Difficulty (MLD) Schools. The TLP saw it as no surprise that teachers in these schools consequently `vote with their feet' and leave, as MLD schools are not pleasant places to work and teachers are unable to carry out their job effectively.

12.7 As mentioned previously in this report, it is interesting to note that the level of challenge (linguistic/socio-economic or attainment/SEN) in schools made very little difference overall to teachers' responses to the 2007 General Teaching Council's annual survey of teachers. However, in both primary and secondary schools facing the highest levels of linguistic/socio-economic challenge, teachers were more likely to envisage progressing into leadership and management posts (other than headship) in the next five years than those in schools facing relatively lower levels of challenge.

12.8 This is borne out in evidence from Hampshire's Education Personnel Services which has noted a slight increase in the number of quality candidates for headship and deputy headships in special schools in recent years. For Hampshire special schools, the recruitment of high quality teachers remains the greatest challenge.

12.9 The Teaching and Development Agency's 2008-13 Strategic Plan claims that the TDA has `several ways of providing professional development support for special educational needs (SEN). We support trainee teachers by making sure SEN and disability focused units are included within Initial Teacher Training and we develop resources for those training teachers on the consistency of SEN and inclusion assessment against qualified teacher status and core standards. For NQTs we provide additional SEN guidance materials and we are working with the DCSF and National Strategies on an inclusion development programme which provides a national rolling programme of CPD for classroom teachers. For those who want to specialise in SEN, we are piloting a masters-level course to enhance their SEN and disabilities knowledge and we also provide a wide range of postgraduate professional development [...] In addition, we are developing a national system of accreditation for teachers newly appointed to the special educational needs coordinator (SENCO) role.'.

12.10 Despite these assurances, a key issue raised by several stakeholders is the absence of specific Initial Teacher Training for special education. Very few NQTs come into teaching specifically to teach in special schools and very often a teacher's interest in special education evolves through their experience in mainstream schools. However, evidence from the Hampshire Special Heads Conference shows how some schools have used the GTP scheme effectively to promote good Learning Support Assistants to teacher posts within their school. This has proved very successful in addressing skilled teacher shortages in the schools where this has been trialled.

12.11 A further hurdle for teachers wishing to train in SEN education is highlighted in evidence from Southampton University. The University claims that trainees have not been allowed to undertake placements in special schools during their training, despite having shown an interest in this area of education. The University is currently exploring options to bring more flexibility into the system, but this is a point of particular interest for the purposes of this review. Further information about the difficulties in managing placements and secondments in and out of special schools was presented during a visit to Shepherd's Down Special School. Members heard that special schools often find it very difficult to manage secondees from mainstream schools since the experience required to operate in a special school setting takes time to acquire. The secondee requires a great deal of support and finding resources to provide this is an issue.

12.12 The barriers to effective collaborations between special and mainstream schools are a major issue to securing a high quality workforce of the future. The National College for School Leadership's publication Leadership and Management in Special Schools stresses the importance of interchanging staff - particularly headteachers - between special and mainstream schools in the interests of providing professional development opportunities and in implementing the Inclusion and Every Child Matters agendas.

12.13 As mentioned previously in this report, the image of teaching as a career is deemed to be an issue by most stakeholders. For special schools, this problem is even deeper, with teaching jobs in special schools being seen by some as having lower kudos than those in mainstream schools. Added to workload issues and the challenges of dealing with complex behaviour, this is a serious issue for Hampshire's special schools.

12.14 Evidence shows that those Hampshire special schools which have achieved specialist status report that this has greatly enhanced the school's reputation and appeal to applicants. Schools in newer, more attractive accommodation also experience fewer recruitment issues.

12.15 In view of the specific difficulties special schools face in recruiting and retaining high quality staff, Members were encouraged to hear that Hampshire's Education Personnel Services will be focusing on special schools during Spring term 2009.

13. Conclusions and Recommendations

13.1 The recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers in Hampshire as a whole does not give particular cause for concern when compared with the national and regional pictures. However, Members are aware that certain parts of the County experience disproportionately large problems, often due to their geographical location within the County. The costs of living in Hampshire along with the County's proximity to alternative employers offering London-weighted salaries arise as key issues, as do the levels of perceived challenge in more disadvantaged areas of the County.

13.2 The critical importance of effective partnership working between the local authority and schools in Hampshire permeates the evidence received by the review group. As the National College for School Leadership asserts, no one agency alone can address issues associated with succession planning. Consideration needs to be made by headteachers, governors, schools and local authorities, as well as other partners at local and national level.

13.3 Hampshire has some excellent local strategies for dealing with recruitment and retention and some - notably programmes delivered through HTLC - are leading the way nationally.

13.4 Members were encouraged by much of the evidence heard, but wished to highlight several areas where continued improved performance would benefit Hampshire schools, their pupils and staff. Members have therefore arrived at the following conclusions and recommendations.

13.5 Conclusions relating to information and intelligence about the workforce

13.6 There are particular difficulties in tracking teachers through the system. Not all employers record all movements between schools and so the actual amount, and reasons for, turnover are difficult to determine. This is not conducive to effective workforce planning across Hampshire schools.

13.7 If collected effectively, `tracking' information could also provide an invaluable resource in understanding teachers' career moves and aspirations and in predicting teacher turnover more accurately.

13.8 Currently very little data exists nationally to show how teachers view teaching as a career and what their aspirations for progression are. The GTC survey provides an interesting insight into this from a national perspective, but it would be helpful to understand teachers' aspirations better, thereby informing workforce planning and helping to target continuing professional development where it is most needed. Indeed, the evidence from a Hampshire NQT showed that, even from the earliest point in a teaching career, it is possible to have very clear career goals and ideas of how these might be achieved. These ambitions should be captured and nurtured from the earliest possible opportunity so that Hampshire is seen as a good place to work and develop a career. Much good practice is evident on this front, but Members feel that a more strategic approach could assist workforce and succession planning for the future.

Recommendations:

1. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services undertake further work to agree with schools and governing bodies ways in which they may capture more accurate data showing teachers' destinations when they move from or between Hampshire schools, so that they may understand the reasons for teachers leaving Hampshire schools and use this information to devise more effective recruitment and retention strategies.

2. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College consider how information regarding the current workforce's career aspirations can be collected and collated centrally to assist with workforce planning and targeting of continuing professional development.

13.9 Conclusions relating to teacher vacancies

13.10 There is a need to focus recruitment and retention activity on headteacher posts - particular primary leadership posts - secondary classroom teachers and special school teacher and leadership posts.

13.11 In Hampshire's primary and secondary schools, the vast majority of headteachers fall in the 50-55 age-group. The figures indicate that headteachers typically retire at 60, so it is projected that a large number of Hampshire headteachers will start to retire from 2009 onwards. There were only 5 retirements in 2005 compared to 42 retirements expected in 2009.

13.12 Nationally, the reasons given for why teachers tend not to stay on beyond 60 include burn out, a wish to move to a less stressful position and the ability to retire in relative comfort given the effectiveness of the pension schemes available. Some headteachers return to school support roles (as School Improvement Partners for example), indicating that they are still willing to work beyond 60: that they retain a commitment to education but that they wish to fill less intensive roles.

13.13 Whilst the pending headteacher retirement figures seem alarming, they also offer an opportunity: if, as appears to be the case, they retain their commitment to work in an educational capacity, they represent a potential source of wisdom and experience that can be deployed to benefit the rest of the service. The potential to engage retiring headteachers as mentors, School Improvement Partners, `trouble shooters' or within other school support and improvement roles within the Local Authority is an opportunity that should be explored further. Much work has been achieved on this through HTLC but more could be done to facilitate a greater programme of mentoring, secondments and leadership development in Hampshire. One headteacher felt that Hampshire did not offer sufficient counselling and career guidance to headteachers - especially those approaching formal retirement.

Recommendations:

3. That Hampshire Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College undertake further work to identify and log details of retiring headteachers who would be prepared to take on work following retirement in support of Hampshire leadership development and school improvement.

4. That greater resource be invested in offering headteachers advice and counselling on career options after formal retirement.

13.14 Conclusions on gender related factors

13.15 Nationally and locally, there are high numbers of women in primary and special school teaching and leadership posts and yet women are relatively under-represented in secondary leadership posts. There is no Hampshire-specific bias in the gender profile of the workforce and so Members offer the following recommendations in the interests of tackling the gender inequalities present in the teaching workforce as a whole, as outlined in section 3.1 of this report.

Recommendations:

5. That greater emphasis is put on ensuring women in secondary schools have the opportunity and are encouraged to participate in programmes such as those put on by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College.

6. That Education Personnel Services prioritises the recruitment of male teachers into primary schools.

7. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report detailing measures being taken to ensure gender equality in Hampshire's teacher recruitment practices, e.g. through governor training on fair recruitment practice.

13.16 Conclusions relating to the age of the workforce

13.17 Aside from the obvious issue of headteacher retirements, the teaching profession experiences higher wastage in the 25-43 age group and high proportions of teachers over 50 leaving the profession. National surveys also point to the 30-49 age groups as being less satisfied with their continuous professional development (a key factor in job satisfaction and achieving a quality workforce). The GTC survey provides some interesting insights into the reasons why teachers become dissatisfied with their careers, but similar information is not available in Hampshire. There is, however, a dearth of information nationally to describe the development needs of teachers in these age-groups. This is acknowledged by HTLC as being a barrier to effective programmes being put in place.

13.18 The implication is that Hampshire is good at offering career support to new teachers and those moving quickly up the ladder. However, when teachers reach the `middle years' of their careers they express less satisfaction with the support they receive. Members believe this is an important issue to be addressed.

Recommendations:

8. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College considers how to capture information about the continuing professional development needs of Hampshire teachers, particularly those in the 35-45 and over 50 age groups.

13.19 Conclusions relating to the ethnicity of the workforce

13.20 Whilst Hampshire has a relatively small black and minority ethnic population, it is currently difficult to see how this population is represented in the teaching workforce, due to the fact that ethnicity data is not collected centrally.

13.21 Some of the evidence suggests that more could be done to encourage BME candidates into teaching, from improving the image of teaching as a career for potential BME teaching candidates, to setting up collaborations between ITT providers and the Local Authority and schools to support improved school-based practice for teachers from less traditional ethnic backgrounds. Hampshire's approach to attracting BME teachers has been described as `complacent' and the evidence suggests that a more strategic approach to BME recruitment would be beneficial, rather than leaving arrangements to local discretion. In the interests of widening the pool of quality candidates for teaching jobs, Members would support further measures to engage high quality BME teachers and school leaders.

Recommendations:

9. That Education Personnel Services leads on the development of a clear strategic statement as to how high quality BME teachers will be recruited and retained in Hampshire. This strategy to address elements including the role of governor training, how teaching as a career is `sold' to BME candidates, the role of collaborations between ITT providers and the local authority and schools in facilitating BME teachers' access to appropriate school placements for school-based practice.

13.22 Conclusions relating to pay

13.23 The evidence does not present pay as an overriding factor in recruitment and retention of high quality teachers. Pay is relatively attractive to newly qualified teachers, but job satisfaction, career development and wellbeing are much more important. However, as teachers climb the ladder, the insignificant pay differentials between management posts appears to deter some senior school leaders from aspiring to headship. More needs to be done to sell the very positive messages in the evidence about the high levels of job satisfaction experienced by many headteachers - `the best job in the world' as one witness described it.

13.24 House prices in Hampshire are a major issue for teachers. Governing bodies have the power to adjust pay to a certain extent, but this is not seen as the most effective tool in retaining teachers. Some other way needs to be found to reflect in pay the differential costs of living in parts of the County.

Recommendations:

10. That the Education Advisory Panel commission a report into the full range of financial incentives available to governing bodies to attract teachers to Hampshire, along with details of how these incentives are currently being used in Hampshire schools.

13.25 Conclusions relating to Hampshire's model of education provision

13.26 Hampshire operates in the main an 11-16 and sixth form college model of education. The evidence suggests that this is not the most attractive model from the point of view of teachers. The 11-18 model of education can be more attractive since it provides greater scope for teachers to develop skills in teaching across the full range of age-groups and gives access to older pupils who are more motivated to learn. However, the Government's change in the compulsory school leaving age could change this. In order to provide the same opportunities for teachers to work across age-groups and in a variety of settings, it is therefore important that schools in an area collaborate with each other.

13.27 The need for schools to collaborate cross-phase (primary-secondary-special) and cross curriculum (impact of 14-19 curriculum) cannot be ignored. The positive impacts in terms of continuity of pupil cohesion, education ethos, community relationships and pastoral care are clear in the evidence received by the review group. This issue was raised in evidence from Hampshire Governors' Association who also pointed to the positive impact of collaboration of this type on the effectiveness of governing bodies - ensuring continuity through the school system.

Recommendations:

11. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services ensure that stronger messages about the positive impact of collaborations e.g. school clusters on staff wellbeing and professional development are communicated to schools and governing bodies in Hampshire and that information about such collaborations - and their effectiveness - is reported to the Education Advisory Panel on a regular basis.

12. That the possibility of having schools with sixth forms alongside the sixth form college model be examined further by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), especially given the Government's plans for raising school leaving age.

13.28 Conclusions relating to school image and teacher perceptions

13.29 The insidious effect of negative media images of teaching and teachers is raised time and again in witnesses' evidence. Schools need to be constantly ahead of the game in presenting themselves in the best possible light to counter these often ill-founded views. Schools in more disadvantaged areas often have the greatest difficulty in managing their image due to perceptions that these schools are more challenging places to work. However, the evidence also shows how great the impact of a good headteacher can be in making these schools attractive to staff and improving outcomes for pupils.

Recommendations:

13. That Hampshire Governor Services targets advice to governing bodies on the need to produce high quality promotional material for their schools, including school websites.

14. That the Education Advisory Panel reviews the feasibility of asking the most outstanding headteachers to work in the most disadvantaged areas, possibly on a part-time or secondment basis.

15. That the highly damaging effects of negative media coverage on the teaching profession are countered by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) in Hampshire through a constant campaign to praise the achievements of schools and their staff.

16. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers using some of the positive findings of this review to promote Hampshire as an excellent place to develop a career in teaching.

13.30 Conclusions relating to workforce reform

13.31 Long working hours and the burdens of administration and inspection are commonly cited drawbacks of teaching as a career. The Government's workforce reforms were intended to address teacher work-life balance, but the evidence indicates that much more needs to be done to implement these reforms, particularly in increasing administrative support in schools. Suggestions from some stakeholders indicate that further monitoring of reform implementation should be undertaken in Hampshire and the evidence also highlights that new Government regulations will require local authorities to report non-compliance with the reforms from 2009 onwards.

13.32 Members agreed that there could be some merit in investigating more flexible models of career path for Hampshire teachers in order to improve staff wellbeing. The review group also concluded that clear arrangements to support newly appointed headteachers are required so as to support school leaders in their role and ensure that expectations of performance and quality are made apparent from the start.

13.33 The new models of headship available to schools are still relatively untested and there is little evidence of their use and impact in Hampshire (although there is evidence of very successful application in some parts of the County). The evidence clearly shows that traditional forms of headship will not suffice in the face of such enormous change for schools brought about by initiatives such as the 14-19 curriculum and the development of Children's Centres. The role of headteachers is now more focused on inter-agency and cross-boundary leadership and brokerage, meaning that many `traditional' headteacher functions need to be carried out by deputies and other school managers to spread the burgeoning workload. This presents opportunities and threats for teachers. Whilst the use of new models of headship awards opportunities to staff to have a taster of leadership, some teachers are concerned that the role of headteacher is becoming ever more removed from the classroom. Some more `traditional' headteachers and governing bodies can find it difficult to come to terms with the fact that modern school leaders require a different skill set to be effective. This in turn impacts on recruitment and selection procedures for headteachers. This represents a significant culture change for governing bodies which will require greater support and monitoring to implement effectively.

Recommendations:

17. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report on the impact of forthcoming regulations relating to the local authority role to report non-compliance with workforce reforms. This report to include details of roles and responsibilities for monitoring compliance.

18. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report considering opportunities for introducing flexible career paths for teachers in Hampshire (i.e. use of gap years) to improve staff wellbeing.

19. That Hampshire Governor Services investigates ways of raising awareness and providing information about the use of more flexible staffing arrangements, including new models of headship, for governing bodies in Hampshire.

20. That the need for governors to make full consideration of the options available to provide administrative support to teachers/headteachers is promoted and monitored by Hampshire Governor Services and Education Personnel Services.

21. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report providing information about schools which have implemented workforce reforms, with details of their impact and outcomes.

22. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College ensure that mentoring and training support to new headteachers is provided as an organisational norm immediately on appointment.

13.34 Conclusions relating to Newly Qualified Teachers

13.35 Recruitment and retention of NQTs is good in Hampshire but Members believe that more needs to be done to identify and develop talent from the earliest stages of a teacher's career. This point is addressed by recommendation 2 of this report.

13.36 Members were interested by references to `informal' recruitment practices being used by schools to target NQTs. This `tap on the shoulder' technique can be flattering to NQTs who may be concerned about securing their first job, but may lead to inappropriate placements in schools which then bring about retention issues later. Members felt there was also sufficiently compelling evidence to suggest that Hampshire may need to increase its visibility at promotional events such as university recruitment fairs.

13.37 Finally, evidence from several initial teacher training providers in the South East shows that they would welcome the opportunity to work in partnership with local authorities in order to devise strategies to address recruitment to initial teacher training in shortage subjects.

Recommendations:

23. That Education Personnel Services develops stronger links with initial teacher training providers in order to present the best career opportunities to NQTs and allow them to make considered choices when seeking their first teaching jobs i.e. through presence at career fairs.

24. That Education Personnel Services considers the benefit of working with the region's initial teacher training providers to address recruitment to initial teacher training for shortage subjects.

13.38 Conclusions relating to governing bodies

13.39 The review group found the practical effectiveness of governing bodies difficult to judge. Governing bodies have a statutory role and defined powers, but the quality of governing bodies still varies enormously. There is a tendency for good schools to have good governing bodies, and vice versa. Indeed, it is quite usual for a poorly achieving school to have governor vacancies, including Chair of Governors.

13.40 The role of the governing body in ensuring quality in the workforce is critical. However, the review group found that governing bodies tend to see their role as supporting rather than leading. Evidence from several stakeholders demonstrates an urgent need for governing bodies to do much more to fulfil their responsibilities in taking action and proactively escalating when there is a performance or leadership issue in the school. Evidence suggests that, when headteachers are struggling, they tend to dominate their governing body and this can lead to criticisms being suppressed. Governing bodies must become more aware of their powers and responsibilities so that they are less likely to be the `rubber stamp' for the headteacher.

13.41 The role of the governing body in ensuring quality in the workforce is critical, but complex. However, the review group found that governing bodies tend to see their role as supporting rather than leading. Evidence from several stakeholders indicates that governing bodies need to get much better at taking action and escalating when there is a performance or leadership issue in the school. Evidence suggests that, when headteachers are struggling, they tend to dominate their governing body and this can lead to criticisms being suppressed. Governing bodies need to be made more aware of their powers and responsibilities so that they are less likely to be the `rubber stamp' for the headteacher.

13.42 The School Improvement Partner is critical in ensuring that issues are raised early in the day. The SIP is the only independent role capable of initiating action to address issues as they arise. The need for the SIP to have a good relationship with governing bodies and headteachers, whilst retaining an element of positive challenge, is vital. It is most important that the relationship does not become too `comfortable'.

13.43 Training opportunities for governing bodies are excellent in Hampshire, but uptake is not always as good as it could be. Accessing training can be difficult, whether due to the timing or location of training. It was also pointed out that some governors have to pay their own travelling costs to access training which is a disincentive.

13.44 The evidence also indicates that governing bodies need to be more proactive in signalling to the local authority when they have teaching posts coming vacant so that appropriate planning can be put in train to fill the gap.

Recommendations:

25. That Hampshire Governor Services makes better use of opportunities to deliver training to clusters of schools in local areas to reduce travelling time for governing bodies and improve access to governor training across the board.

26. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how a requirement could be made for school governors to undertake a certain amount of compulsory training on managing performance in schools.

27. That School Improvement Partners do not support the same school(s) for more than 3 years, so as to maintain the independence of the SIP and its ability to challenge school performance in a constructive way.

28. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how the Local Authority and Hampshire schools could create a requirement for School Improvement Partners to submit regular reports to governing bodies on agreed aspects of school performance in order to provide early indications of any upcoming performance or staffing issues.

13.45 Conclusions relating to leadership development programmes

13.46 The excellence of Hampshire's leadership development programmes is indisputable. Evidence from the National College for School Leadership shows Hampshire to be a national leader in this field and Members were left with no doubt of the quality of programmes available to Hampshire teachers in this respect.

13.47 Members felt that more could be done to assess the true impact on the recruitment and retention of high quality teachers and headteachers of programmes delivered by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College. The review group felt that there was currently a lack of clearly articulated strategic outcomes for this area of work and that this represented a lost opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of HTLC's work. Members believe that more thorough evaluation of HTLC programmes is needed and that success stories should be more widely celebrated.

13.48 Awareness of HTLC's leadership programmes needs to be increased in Hampshire schools and, as a consequence to this, more resources may be required to cater for an increase in the number of participants on the programmes (which the review group would welcome). The review group also felt that improved targeting of HTLC's programmes to groups currently underrepresented in the workforce (i.e. women secondary leaders, male primary and special teachers) would be an effective way of widening the talent pool for school leaders. Again, this would have an impact on current levels of resources.

Recommendations:

29. That an overarching strategy for school leadership development in Hampshire is drawn up stating the full strategic aims of the programmes and identifying clear success criteria against which progress can be monitored and evaluated.

30. That information about the Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College's projects forms part of Member induction training at HCC, in time for the new administration in 2009.

31. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), together with the Schools Forum, considers the cost-benefit of investing more heavily in HTLC's leadership development projects, to increase the programmes' capacity and improve awareness of their availability amongst schools and governing bodies as a way of protecting the school workforce of the future in Hampshire.

32. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), together with the Schools Forum, considers how a requirement could be put in place for all Hampshire headteachers to evaluate future potential amongst their staff and enable teachers to participate in leadership training.

13.49 Conclusions relating to quality

13.50 The quality of the workforce was a key theme Members wished to address under this review. Whilst questions of quality are embedded within the main body of this report, Members wished to highlight their conclusions relating to the importance of school performance management frameworks in this context. The evidence makes it clear that individual schools and governing bodies have a significant role in the day-to-day management of quality through identifying and developing teachers with potential, providing opportunities for development and progression and recognising and celebrating achievements. Clear performance management arrangements help schools to identify where performance is wavering, therefore providing ample opportunity for a school to signal to its local authority or School Improvement Partner that assistance is required. Strong leadership, good opportunities for professional development and a culture which celebrates achievement are all attractive to good staff and are key to successful recruitment and retention. The evidence suggests that some schools in Hampshire may need to increase their focus on performance management in order to attract and retain high quality staff.

13.51 Conclusions relating to special schools

13.52 Special schools experience many of the same problems as mainstream schools in recruiting and retaining high quality teachers and headteachers, such as high levels of vacancies in the north of Hampshire. However, several issues particular to special schools were raised in the evidence which Members wish to highlight.

13.53 The lack of specific initial teacher training for Special Educational Needs appears as a major issue for special school recruitment and retention. Whilst some schools have used the Graduate Teacher Programme as an effective training ground for special school teachers, the lack of support to trainee teachers wishing to specialise in special education is a huge barrier to achieving this aim.

13.54 Members heard evidence that, whilst the Training and Development Agency for Schools is looking at ways of improving the focus on SEN in Initial Teacher Training, trainee teachers are not generally permitted to undertake placements in special schools during their training despite having shown an interest in special education. Some teachers in mainstream schools undertake secondments to special schools to acquire on-the-job training, although the evidence shows that such secondments are extremely difficult for special schools to manage due to the support requirements of the secondee in a special school environment.

13.55 All these factors have led to a lack of teachers with SEN knowledge.

13.56 Members were also interested by discussions about the role of special school education. Whilst the evidence shows that the County's Inclusion and SEN policies make the role and responsibilities of special schools clear, there appears to be some debate as to whether children with the most severe and complex needs are suffering in special schools as a result of children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties being placed in multiple learning difficulty schools. This is a complex debate, but relevant to the issue of teacher job satisfaction and so Members feel that this issue may need to be probed further.

Recommendations:

33. That, as part of its focus on special school recruitment in 2009, Education Personnel Services investigates with initial teacher training providers and Hampshire special schools ways of addressing the shortage of teachers with specialist SEN knowledge in Hampshire.

34. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools, ensures that career opportunities for staff in special schools are more visibly promoted and encouraged.

35. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools and initial teacher training providers, investigate the best ways to provide school-based practice for trainee teachers in Hampshire special schools.

36. That the Education Advisory Panel commissions a report on the role of multiple learning difficulty schools in educating children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.

Hampshire County Council

Children and Young People Select Committee

Review of Recruitment and Retention of High Quality Teachers and Headteachers

Recommendations

Recommendations relating to information and intelligence about the workforce

1. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services undertake further work to agree with schools and governing bodies ways in which they may capture more accurate data showing teachers' destinations when they move from or between Hampshire schools, so that they may understand the reasons for teachers leaving Hampshire schools and use this information to devise more effective recruitment and retention strategies.

2. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College consider how information regarding the current workforce's career aspirations can be collected and collated centrally to assist with workforce planning and targeting of continuing professional development.

Recommendations relating to teacher vacancies

3. That Hampshire Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College undertake further work to identify and log details of retiring headteachers who would be prepared to take on work following retirement in support of Hampshire leadership development and school improvement.

4. That greater resource be invested in offering headteachers advice and counselling on career options after formal retirement.

Recommendations on gender related factors

5. That greater emphasis is put on ensuring women in secondary schools have the opportunity and are encouraged to participate in programmes such as those put on by Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College.

6. That Education Personnel Services prioritises the recruitment of male teachers into primary schools.

7. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report detailing measures being taken to ensure gender equality in Hampshire's teacher recruitment practices, e.g. through governor training on fair recruitment practice.

Recommendations relating to the age of the workforce

8. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College considers how to capture information about the continuing professional development needs of Hampshire teachers, particularly those in the 35-45 and over 50 age groups.

Recommendations relating to the ethnicity of the workforce

9. That Education Personnel Services leads on the development of a clear strategic statement as to how high quality BME teachers will be recruited and retained in Hampshire. This strategy to address elements including the role of governor training, how teaching as a career is `sold' to BME candidates, the role of collaborations between ITT providers and the local authority and schools in facilitating BME teachers' access to appropriate school placements for school-based practice.

Recommendations relating to pay

10. That the Education Advisory Panel commission a report into the full range of financial incentives available to governing bodies to attract teachers to Hampshire, along with details of how these incentives are currently being used in Hampshire schools.

Recommendations relating to Hampshire's model of education provision

11. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Governor Services ensure that stronger messages about the positive impact of collaborations e.g. school clusters on staff wellbeing and professional development are communicated to schools and governing bodies in Hampshire and that information about such collaborations - and their effectiveness - is reported to the Education Advisory Panel on a regular basis.

12. That the possibility of having schools with sixth forms alongside the sixth form college model be examined further by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), especially given the Government's plans for raising school leaving age.

Recommendations relating to school image and teacher perceptions

13. That Hampshire Governor Services targets advice to governing bodies on the need to produce high quality promotional material for their schools, including school websites.

14. That the Education Advisory Panel reviews the feasibility of asking the most outstanding headteachers to work in the most disadvantaged areas, possibly on a part-time or secondment basis.

15. That the highly damaging effects of negative media coverage on the teaching profession are countered by the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) in Hampshire through a constant campaign to praise the achievements of schools and their staff.

16. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers using some of the positive findings of this review to promote Hampshire as an excellent place to develop a career in teaching.

Recommendations relating to workforce reform

17. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report on the impact of forthcoming regulations relating to the local authority role to report non-compliance with workforce reforms. This report to include details of roles and responsibilities for monitoring compliance.

18. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report considering opportunities for introducing flexible career paths for teachers in Hampshire (i.e. use of gap years) to improve staff wellbeing.

19. That Hampshire Governor Services investigates ways of raising awareness and providing information about the use of more flexible staffing arrangements, including new models of headship, for governing bodies in Hampshire.

20. That the need for governors to make full consideration of the options available to provide administrative support to teachers/headteachers is promoted and monitored by Hampshire Governor Services and Education Personnel Services.

21. That the Education Advisory Panel requests a report providing information about schools which have implemented workforce reforms, with details of their impact and outcomes.

22. That Education Personnel Services and Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College ensure that mentoring and training support to new headteachers is provided as an organisational norm immediately on appointment.

Recommendations relating to Newly Qualified Teachers

23. That Education Personnel Services develops stronger links with initial teacher training providers in order to present the best career opportunities to NQTs and allow them to make considered choices when seeking their first teaching jobs i.e. through presence at career fairs.

24. That Education Personnel Services considers the benefit of working with the region's initial teacher training providers to address recruitment to initial teacher training for shortage subjects.

Recommendations relating to governing bodies

25. That Hampshire Governor Services makes better use of opportunities to deliver training to clusters of schools in local areas to reduce travelling time for governing bodies and improve access to governor training across the board.

26. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how a requirement could be made for school governors to undertake a certain amount of compulsory training on managing performance in schools.

27. That School Improvement Partners do not support the same school(s) for more than 3 years, so as to maintain the independence of the SIP and its ability to challenge school performance in a constructive way.

28. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers how the Local Authority and Hampshire schools could create a requirement for School Improvement Partners to submit regular reports to governing bodies on agreed aspects of school performance in order to provide early indications of any upcoming performance or staffing issues.

Recommendations relating to leadership development programmes

29. That an overarching strategy for school leadership development in Hampshire is drawn up stating the full strategic aims of the programmes and identifying clear success criteria against which progress can be monitored and evaluated.

30. That information about the Hampshire Teaching and Leadership College's projects forms part of Member induction training at HCC, in time for the new administration in 2009.

31. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education) considers the cost-benefit of investing more heavily in HTLC's leadership development projects, to increase the programmes' capacity and improve awareness of their availability amongst schools and governing bodies as a way of protecting the school workforce of the future in Hampshire.

32. That the Executive Member for Children's Services (Education), together with the Schools Forum, considers how a requirement could be put in place for all Hampshire headteachers to evaluate future potential amongst their staff and enable teachers to participate in leadership training.

Recommendations relating to special schools

33. That, as part of its focus on special school recruitment in 2009, Education Personnel Services investigates with initial teacher training providers and Hampshire special schools ways of addressing the shortage of teachers with specialist SEN knowledge in Hampshire.

34. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools, ensures that career opportunities for staff in special schools are more visibly promoted and encouraged.

35. That Education Personnel Services, together with Hampshire special schools and initial teacher training providers, investigate the best ways to provide school-based practice for trainee teachers in Hampshire special schools.

36. That the Education Advisory Panel commissions a report on the role of multiple learning difficulty schools in educating children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.

Annexe A

Table 1b: Primary, secondary and special schools: full time equivalent number of pupils by age group1, 2

Years: Position in January each year: 2004 to 2008 (Provisional)

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008 (Provisional)

PRIMARY SCHOOLS3

Pupils aged2:

Under 5

684,910

673,830

669,930

673,660

696,060

5 to 10

3,411,380

3,381,970

3,338,130

3,294,750

3,254,190

11 to 15

16,310

13,390

10,790

9,530

7,050

All ages4

4,112,620

4,069,200

4,018,860

3,977,960

3,957,330

SECONDARY SCHOOLS3, 5, 6

Pupils aged2:

Under 5

50

230

300

390

710

5 to 10

56,040

53,660

52,360

52,080

51,290

11 to 15

2,952,110

2,938,440

2,930,300

2,899,040

2,856,540

16 to 19+

343,070

355,080

361,070

369,740

379,050

All ages4

3,351,260

3,347,410

3,344,030

3,321,250

3,287,600

MAINTAINED SPECIAL SCHOOLS

Pupils aged2:

Under 5

3,980

3,710

3,740

3,720

3,820

5 to 10

27,750

26,670

25,820

25,520

25,360

11 to 15

46,580

46,210

45,910

45,770

45,370

16 to 19+

7,540

7,920

8,340

8,860

9,360

All ages4

85,840

84,520

83,820

83,870

83,910

NON MAINTAINED SPECIAL SCHOOLS

Pupils aged2:

Under 5

60

60

50

50

40

5 to 10

840

860

780

710

660

11 to 15

2,810

2,790

2,730

2,660

2,570

16 to 19+

1,100

1,140

1,190

1,290

1,380

All ages4

4,810

4,850

4,750

4,700

4,650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: School Census

1. Full time equivalent (FTE) numbers count part-time pupils as 0.5. Excludes dually registered pupils.

2. Age as at 31 August in the previous year.

3. Includes middle schools as deemed.

4. Totals include those pupils for whom age is unclassified.

5. Includes CTCs and Academies.

6. Middle deemed secondary schools and all through schools deemed as secondary result in some pupils

aged less than five in overall secondary schools.

Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10.

Source: DCSF

Annexe B

TABLE 21: Full-time vacancy1 numbers and rates2 in local authority maintained schools by phase, local authority and Government Office Region in England.

Years: January 2008

 

 

 

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nursery and

Secondary

Special

Total

Overall

 

 

primary

 

 

 

vacancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

rate (%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLAND TOTAL

 

870

1,470

170

2,510

0.7

Rate (%)

 

0.5

0.8

1.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gateshead

 

5

6

2

13

0.9

Newcastle upon Tyne

 

5

2

0

7

0.4

North Tyneside

 

0

1

1

2

0.1

South Tyneside

 

1

1

0

2

0.2

Sunderland

 

2

6

1

9

0.4

Hartlepool

 

1

1

0

2

0.2

Middlesbrough

 

1

1

1

3

0.3

Redcar and Cleveland

 

2

12

0

14

1.2

Stockton on Tees

 

2

3

0

5

0.3

Darlington

 

0

3

0

3

0.4

Durham (post 1.4.97)

 

8

24

0

32

0.8

Northumberland

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

NORTH EAST

 

30

60

10

90

0.5

Rate (%)

 

0.3

0.6

0.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cumbria

 

3

4

0

7

0.2

Cheshire (post 1.4.98)

 

1

7

1

9

0.2

Halton

 

2

2

0

4

0.4

Warrington

 

2

1

0

3

0.2

Bolton

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Bury

 

4

1

0

5

0.4

Manchester

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Oldham

 

3

7

0

10

0.5

Rochdale

 

4

6

0

10

0.6

Salford

 

5

5

2

12

0.8

Stockport

 

5

4

0

9

0.5

Tameside

 

3

6

0

9

0.5

Trafford

 

0

4

0

4

0.2

Wigan

 

3

1

1

5

0.2

Lancashire (post 1.4.98)

 

4

8

0

12

0.1

Blackburn with Darwen

 

0

1

0

1

0.1

Blackpool

 

2

2

0

4

0.4

Knowsley

 

4

5

2

11

0.9

Liverpool

 

1

4

2

7

0.2

St Helens

 

3

1

0

4

0.3

Sefton

 

7

7

3

17

0.8

Wirral

 

21

13

6

40

1.6

NORTH WEST

 

80

90

20

180

0.3

Rate (%)

 

0.3

0.3

0.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

continued overleaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 21 continued

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 21: Full-time vacancy1 numbers and rates2 in local authority maintained schools by phase, local authority and Government Office Region in England.

Years: January 2008

 

 

 

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nursery and

Secondary

Special

Total

Overall

 

 

primary

 

 

 

vacancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

rate (%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kingston-Upon-Hull, City of

2

13

3

18

1.0

East Riding of Yorkshire

 

3

1

1

5

0.2

North East Lincolnshire

 

2

6

0

8

0.8

North Lincolnshire

 

0

5

0

5

0.4

North Yorkshire (post 1.4.96)

2

11

0

13

0.3

York

 

5

3

0

8

0.7

Barnsley

 

3

12

0

15

0.9

Doncaster

 

15

13

0

28

1.2

Rotherham

 

13

23

0

36

1.7

Sheffield

 

16

18

2

36

1.1

Bradford

 

28

19

0

47

1.1

Calderdale

 

2

6

0

8

0.5

Kirklees

 

0

2

0

2

0.1

Leeds

 

9

14

0

23

0.4

Wakefield

 

0

0

1

1

0.0

YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER

100

150

10

250

0.7

Rate (%)

 

0.6

0.8

0.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derbyshire (post 1.4.97)

 

13

19

2

34

0.7

Derby

 

5

4

0

9

0.5

Leicestershire (post 1.4.97)

4

14

1

19

0.5

Leicester

 

14

13

4

31

1.4

Rutland

 

0

1

0

1

0.5

Lincolnshire

 

4

17

1

22

0.5

Northamptonshire

 

8

12

1

21

0.4

Nottinghamshire (post 1.4.98)

5

1

0

6

0.1

Nottingham

 

0

7

0

7

0.4

EAST MIDLANDS

 

50

90

10

150

0.5

Rate (%)

 

0.4

0.6

1.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herefordshire

 

0

1

0

1

0.1

Worcestershire

 

5

16

0

21

0.5

Shropshire (post 1.4.98)

 

2

3

1

6

0.3

Telford & Wrekin

 

10

3

0

13

1.1

Staffordshire (post 1.4.97)

5

21

1

27

0.4

Stoke-on-Trent

 

5

5

0

10

0.6

Warwickshire

 

2

19

2

23

0.6

Birmingham

 

76

78

9

163

1.7

Coventry

 

10

12

0

22

0.9

Dudley

 

2

27

2

31

1.3

Sandwell

 

2

2

1

5

0.2

Solihull

 

3

13

3

19

1.2

Walsall

 

2

11

2

15

0.6

Wolverhampton

 

3

9

1

13

0.6

WEST MIDLANDS

 

130

220

20

370

0.9

Rate (%)

 

0.7

1.0

1.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

continued overleaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 21 continued

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 21: Full-time vacancy1 numbers and rates2 in local authority maintained schools by phase, local authority and Government Office Region in England.

Years: January 2008

 

 

 

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nursery and

Secondary

Special

Total

Overall

 

 

primary

 

 

 

vacancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

rate (%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cambridgeshire (post 1.4.98)

1

13

0

14

0.4

Peterborough

 

6

2

1

9

0.8

Norfolk

 

14

25

2

41

0.8

Suffolk

 

3

9

0

12

0.3

Bedfordshire (post 1.4.97)

 

3

29

4

36

1.2

Luton

 

5

10

4

19

1.4

Essex (post 1.4.98)

 

33

26

4

63

0.7

Southend-on-Sea

 

1

3

1

5

0.4

Thurrock

 

10

5

2

17

1.7

Hertfordshire

 

18

70

8

96

1.2

EAST OF ENGLAND

 

90

190

30

310

0.8

Rate (%)

 

0.6

0.9

2.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of London

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Camden

 

8

7

2

17

1.5

Greenwich

 

8

24

4

36

1.8

Hackney

 

0

8

5

13

1.0

Hammersmith and Fulham

 

2

0

1

3

0.4

Islington

 

21

12

4

37

3.1

Kensington and Chelsea

 

3

3

0

6

1.1

Lambeth

 

11

10

2

23

1.5

Lewisham

 

3

2

0

5

0.3

Southwark

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Tower Hamlets

 

13

7

3

23

1.1

Wandsworth

 

12

18

3

33

2.2

Westminster

 

14

10

0

24

2.4

Barking and Dagenham

 

10

0

0

10

0.6

Barnet

 

1

0

0

1

0.0

Bexley

 

9

18

1

28

1.6

Brent

 

11

14

0

25

1.1

Bromley

 

2

3

0

5

0.2

Croydon

 

14

13

3

30

1.3

Ealing

 

4

7

0

11

0.5

Enfield

 

4

19

2

25

1.0

Haringey

 

10

10

1

21

1.3

Harrow

 

1

4

0

5

0.4

Havering

 

0

8

0

8

0.5

Hillingdon

 

15

23

0

38

1.9

Hounslow

 

1

9

3

13

0.7

Kingston upon Thames

 

8

3

0

11

1.1

Merton

 

2

6

0

8

0.8

Newham

 

6

35

4

45

1.7

Redbridge

 

1

4

1

6

0.3

Richmond upon Thames

 

3

10

2

15

1.7

Sutton

 

4

13

2

19

1.2

Waltham Forest

 

13

4

3

20

1.1

LONDON3

 

210

300

50

560

1.1

Rate (%)

 

0.8

1.2

2.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

continued overleaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 21 continued

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE 21: Full-time vacancy1 numbers and rates2 in local authority maintained schools by phase, local authority and Government Office Region in England.

Years: January 2008

 

 

 

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nursery and

Secondary

Special

Total

Overall

 

 

primary

 

 

 

vacancy

 

 

 

 

 

 

rate (%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bracknell Forest

 

0

2

1

3

0.4

Windsor and Maidenhead

 

4

7

1

12

1.3

West Berkshire

 

3

4

0

7

0.5

Reading

 

1

2

1

4

0.5

Slough

 

8

12

0

20

1.9

Wokingham

 

1

3

0

4

0.4

Buckinghamshire (post 1.4.97)

7

32

2

41

1.2

Milton Keynes

 

4

7

1

12

0.6

East Sussex (post 1.4.97)

 

9

10

1

20

0.7

Brighton and Hove

 

2

4

0

6

0.4

Hampshire (post 1.4.97)

 

23

40

0

63

0.8

Portsmouth

 

2

3

3

8

0.7

Southampton

 

2

0

1

3

0.2

Isle of Wight

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Kent (post 1.4.98)

 

17

74

7

98

1.0

Medway

 

7

14

5

26

1.2

Oxfordshire

 

21

28

0

49

1.2

Surrey

 

14

30

4

48

0.7

West Sussex

 

4

20

2

26

0.5

SOUTH EAST

 

130

290

30

450

0.8

Rate (%)

 

0.5

1.0

1.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isles of Scilly

 

0

0

0

0

0.0

Bath and North East Somerset

3

6

1

10

0.9

City of Bristol

 

11

5

1

17

0.8

North Somerset

 

1

0

0

1

0.1

South Gloucestershire

 

1

1

0

2

0.1

Cornwall

 

1

13

1

15

0.4

Devon (post 1.4.98)

 

3

10

0

13

0.3

Plymouth

 

0

1

0

1

0.1

Torbay

 

0

1

0

1

0.1

Dorset (post 1.4.97)

 

9

4

1

14

0.5

Poole

 

0

3

0

3

0.3

Bournemouth

 

2

6

0

8

0.8

Gloucestershire

 

6

18

2

26

0.6

Somerset

 

2

5

0

7

0.2

Wiltshire (post 1.4.97)

 

5

2

0

7

0.2

Swindon

 

7

6

1

14

1.0

SOUTH WEST

 

50

80

10

140

0.4

Rate (%)

 

0.3

0.5

0.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: 618g survey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments (or appointments of at least one term's duration). Includes vacancies being filled on a temporary basis of less than one term.

2. Vacancies as a percentage of teachers in post ie full-time regular teachers in (or on secondment from) maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools, plus full-time regular divided service, peripatetic, advisory and miscellaneous teachers.

3. The 2008 vacancy rates for the inner and the outer London weighting areas are Nursery/Primary 1.0% and 0.7% respectively, secondary 1.5%, 1.0%, special 3.0%, 2.1%, all phases 1.3%, 0.9%.

Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because of rounding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: DCSF School Workforce in England, revised January 2008: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000813/index.shtml

Annexe C

Hampshire Teaching Vacancies

Adverts Placed on Hantsweb - Total per district by Academic Year

Teaching

Primary

Secondary

 

Borough

 

Borough

Area

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

1

BDCC

97

89

94

115

119

BDCC

97

90

123

107

160

EHDC

63

59

79

74

78

EHDC

27

33

47

36

60

HDC

48

34

58

70

64

HDC

71

71

61

68

74

RBC

79

54

63

82

76

RBC

59

59

47

39

51

2

FBC

57

32

45

47

80

FBC

54

23

53

56

62

GBC

30

38

38

41

56

GBC

18

26

18

12

4

HBC

44

32

52

42

49

HBC

35

46

47

45

63

3

TVBC

59

55

81

75

77

TVBC

59

47

49

52

31

WCC

52

63

76

67

64

WCC

37

30

34

90

77

4

EBC

55

47

61

46

70

EBC

82

68

85

93

104

NFDC

78

75

64

70

64

NFDC

45

40

58

41

42

Totals

662

578

711

729

797

Totals

584

533

622

639

728

Hampshire teaching vacancies

                   

Teaching Adverts - total per district by term.

           
                             

Autumn (1 August - 31 December)

Spring (1 January - 31 March)

Summer (1 April - 31 July)

   
                             

Autumn

Primary

Secondary

 

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

Area

Borough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

BDCC

16

20

23

21

28

 

14

12

13

28

43

 

 

EHDC

15

15

6

18

27

 

10

8

8

7

15

 

 

HDC

8

8

8

21

16

 

11

15

12

6

23

 

 

RBC

20

15

14

15

26

 

6

10

3

6

8

 

 

2

FBC

11

9

11

7

25

 

6

5

5

20

12

 

 

GBC

5

8

7

10

20

 

3

7

4

5

1

 

 

HBC

17

8

11

5

12

 

6

9

10

10

10

 

 

3

TVBC

9

10

25

16

29

 

6

5

5

14

4

 

 

WCC

8

15

11

21

22

 

4

6

4

11

18

 

 

4

EBC

18

15

13

17

19

 

21

11

11

17

34

 

 

NFDC

14

25

17

20

18

 

13

6

11

8

5

 

 
 

Totals

141

148

146

171

242

 

100

94

86

132

173

 

 
                             
                             

Spring

Primary

Secondary

 

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

Area

Borough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

BDCC

 

39

24

24

39

42

 

51

36

41

37

72

 

EHDC

 

19

15

29

25

20

 

8

3

18

9

23

 

HDC

 

20

7

18

16

18

 

26

18

19

22

35

 

RBC

 

23

11

18

17

23

 

17

24

22

13

19

 

2

FBC

 

22

6

17

15

23

 

12

5

16

21

31

 

GBC

 

7

9

13

13

16

 

8

9

6

3

2

 

HBC

 

9

7

15

14

18

 

15

21

20

23

31

 

3

TVBC

 

16

17

25

26

22

 

26

25

22

17

9

 

WCC

 

15

20

32

17

12

 

20

8

15

47

35

 

4

EBC

 

16

14

22

14

20

 

21

21

32

37

44

 

NFDC

 

25

19

20

19

22

 

18

9

15

17

30

 
 

Totals

 

211

149

233

215

236

 

222

179

226

246

331

 
                             
                             

Summer

Primary

Secondary

 

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

Area

Borough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

BDCC

 

42

45

47

55

52

 

32

42

69

42

46

 

EHDC

 

29

29

44

31

35

 

9

22

21

20

22

 

HDC

 

20

19

32

33

31

 

34

38

30

40

18

 

RBC

 

36

28

31

50

29

 

36

25

22

20

26

 

2

FBC

 

24

17

17

25

32

 

36

13

32

15

20

 

GBC

 

18

21

18

18

21

 

7

10

8

4

3

 

HBC

 

18

17

26

23

21

 

14

16

17

12

24

 

3

TVBC

 

34

28

31

33

27

 

27

17

22

21

19

 

WCC

 

29

28

33

29

32

 

13

16

15

32

24

 

4

EBC

 

21

18

26

15

32

 

40

36

42

39

27

 

NFDC

 

39

31

27

31

26

 

14

25

32

16

9

 
 

Totals

 

310

281

332

343

338

 

262

260

310

261

238

 
                             

Annexe D

TABLE 8: Full-time classroom teacher vacancy1,2 rates in local authority maintained secondary schools by subject.

Years: January 1997, 2000 to 2008

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vacancies

 

 

1997

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008(p)

2008(p)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All vacancies

0.4

0.7

1.5

1.4

1.2

0.9

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.8

1,390

Main teaching subject3

Mathematics

0.4

1.2

2.1

1.9

1.5

1.4

1.2

1.1

-

-

250

Information Technology

0.4

1.3

2.8

1.4

1.6

1.5

1.5

1.4

-

-

90

All sciences4

0.3

0.6

1.6

1.4

1.2

1.0

1.1

0.9

-

-

270

Languages

0.5

0.7

1.5

1.3

1.1

0.7

0.5

0.3

-

-

60

English

0.4

0.7

1.8

1.5

1.3

1.0

0.9

0.9

-

-

210

Drama

0.5

0.7

1.7

1.5

1.1

0.9

0.9

0.5

-

-

30

History

0.1

0.2

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.4

-

-

40

Social sciences

0.2

0.2

0.4

0.7

0.3

0.4

0.6

0.5

-

-

20

Geography

0.3

0.3

0.6

0.9

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.4

-

-

40

Religious education

0.4

0.7

1.8

1.4

1.4

1.4

1.0

0.9

-

-

50

Design and technology

0.4

0.7

1.3

1.3

1.0

1.0

0.8

0.5

-

-

80

Commercial/business studies

0.4

0.5

1.3

1.0

1.4

0.8

1.0

0.7

-

-

20

Art, craft or design

0.2

0.3

0.7

0.8

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

-

-

30

Music

0.8

0.8

1.8

1.7

1.3

1.1

1.2

1.4

-

-

40

Physical education

0.2

0.2

0.8

0.8

0.6

0.6

0.7

0.5

-

-

60

Careers

1.0

1.4

4.3

2.5

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

-

-

0

Other main and combined subjects

0.7

1.2

1.7

2.2

1.8

1.6

1.5

1.5

-

-

130

Total vacancies (numbers)

650

1,140

2,530

2,350

1,940

1,530

1,440

1,230

1,130

1,390

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: 618g survey

(p) Provisional

1. Advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments (or appointments of at least one term's duration). Includes vacancies being filled on a temporary basis of less than one term. See notes to editors for further details.

2. Teachers in post include full-time qualified regular teachers in (or on secondment from) maintained secondary schools, plus the secondary portion of full-time regular divided service, peripatetic, advisory and miscellaneous teachers.

3. The number of teachers in post by main teaching subject is estimated using the Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey (1996 survey for years 1997-2001 and 2002 survey for years 2002-2006).

4. The distinction between single science vacancy rates and combined science has been discontinued.

Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because of rounding.

Source: DCSF http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000787/index.shtml

Annexe E

TABLE 6: Full-time vacancy1 rates in local authority maintained schools by grade.

Years: January 1997, 2000 to 2008

Coverage: England

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vacancies as a percentage of teachers in post2

Number of

 

vacancies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1997

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008(p)

2008(p)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NURSERY AND PRIMARY

All vacancies

Number

1,090

1,420

2,110

1,800

1,110

780

740

710

660

870

Rate

0.6

0.8

1.2

1

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.4

0.5

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

0.9

1

1.2

1

0.8

0.7

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.8

290

Head

0.6

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.5

0.5

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.6

110

Deputy head/Assistant head

1.3

1.3

1.8

1.2

1.1

1

0.8

0.9

0.7

1

180

Classroom teacher

0.5

0.8

1.2

1.1

0.6

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.4

580

SECONDARY

All vacancies

Number

730

1,250

2,590

2,450

2,050

1,630

1,550

1,340

1,210

1,470

Rate

0.4

0.7

1.4

1.3

1.1

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.8

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

0.7

1.0

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.4

0.4

90

Head

0.8

1.1

0.9

0.9

0.9

0.5

1.0

0.9

0.5

0.6

20

Deputy head/Assistant head

0.7

0.9

0.7

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.4

0.4

60

Classroom teacher

0.4

0.7

1.5

1.4

1.2

0.9

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.8

1,390

SPECIAL

All vacancies

Number

200

240

280

290

240

220

190

180

170

170

Rate

1.5

1.9

2.2

2.4

2

1.8

1.6

1.6

1.4

1.4

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

1.9

2.5

1.7

1.6

1.2

1.0

1.3

1.5

1.3

0.9

30

Head

1.2

2.5

1.0

1.1

1.0

0.8

0.9

1.6

1.2

0.6

10

Deputy head/Assistant head

2.7

2.6

2.3

2.0

1.4

1.2

1.5

1.4

1.4

1.1

20

Classroom teacher

1.4

1.8

2.3

2.6

2.2

2.0

1.7

1.6

1.4

1.5

140

NURSERY/PRIMARY, SECONDARY AND SPECIAL

All vacancies

Number

2,020

2,910

4,980

4,540

3,410

2,630

2,480

2,230

2,040

2,510

Rate

0.6

0.8

1.4

1.2

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.6

0.7

Grade3, 4

Head or Deputy/Assistant

1.0

1.1

1.1

0.9

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.8

0.6

0.7

400

Head

0.7

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.5

0.8

0.8

0.6

0.6

140

Deputy head/Assistant head

1.2

1.3

1.3

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.7

270

Classroom teacher

0.5

0.8

1.4

1.3

1.0

0.7

0.7

0.6

0.5

0.7

2,110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: 618g survey

(p) Provisional

1. Advertised vacancies for full-time permanent appointments (or appointments of at least one term's duration).

Includes vacancies being filled on a temporary basis of less than one term. See notes to editors for further details.

2. Teachers in post include full-time qualified regular teachers in (or on secondment from) maintained nursery and primary

schools, plus the primary portion of full-time regular divided service, peripatetic, advisory and miscellaneous teachers.

3. The number of teachers in post by grade is from the 618g survey for 2001 onwards, previous years were

estimated using the Database of Teacher Records.

4. The role of assistant head was created in 2001.

Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because of rounding.

Source: DCSF http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000787/index.shtml

Annexe F

Hampshire teacher vacancies

       

Secondary Core Subjects Adverts

     
             
 

01/08/2006 - 31/07/2007

01/08/2007 - 16/06/2008

 

English

Maths

Science

English

Maths

Science

Basingstoke & Deane

14

18

6

28

31

24

East Hampshire

3

6

3

10

8

8

Hart District

11

8

6

12

3

15

Rushmoor

4

3

9

10

5

9

Fareham

3

3

11

10

8

7

Gosport

0

5

0

0

1

0

Havant

6

2

5

10

10

6

Test Valley

5

3

11

2

4

6

Winchester

13

14

18

9

17

14

Eastleigh

16

11

10

15

19

11

New Forest

6

2

5

6

9

7

             

Current 'Live' Adverts as of 16th June 2008

     
             

Headteacher = 2

Deputy Headteacher =

Assistant Headteacher = 0

             

Head of Department = 1

           
             

Teaching = 44 of which English = 2; Maths = 6, Science = 3

   

Hampshire teacher vacancies

Secondary Core & Non-Core Foundation Subjects Adverts

01/08/2006 - 31/07/2007

Borough

English

Maths

Science

PE

MFL

ICT

ART

Tech

Drama

Business Studies

Music

Geography

Food Tech

History

Misc

Basingstoke & Deane

14

18

6

2

8

8

4

3

0

0

6

5

0

7

6

East Hampshire

3

6

3

4

1

2

0

3

1

0

0

3

0

2

3

Hart District

11

8

6

3

3

6

4

0

2

0

3

0

0

3

13

Rushmoor

4

3

9

5

3

3

0

1

1

1

2

2

1

2

3

Fareham

5

3

11

6

5

7

6

0

0

1

0

0

1

2

2

Gosport

0

5

0

0

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Havant

6

2

5

5

3

2

0

1

0

1

4

3

1

5

2

Test Valley

5

3

11

5

4

1

3

0

7

0

1

1

0

3

1

Winchester

13

14

18

5

3

4

1

4

2

7

4

2

1

1

0

Eastleigh

17

11

10

7

2

7

5

3

4

2

3

3

1

2

3

New Forest

6

2

5

3

4

3

2

0

0

1

1

2

2

2

3

Totals

84

75

84

45

36

44

25

17

17

13

24

21

7

29

37

01/08/2007 - 16/06/2008

Borough

English

Maths

Science

PE

MFL

ICT

ART

Tech

Drama

Business Studies

Music

Geography

Food Tech

History

Misc

Basingstoke & Deane

28

31

24

9

9

8

5

3

1

1

5

5

1

0

4

East Hampshire

10

8

8

1

5

3

2

3

2

2

3

2

2

0

0

Hart District

12

3

15

1

6

11

2

0

3

1

2

2

1

1

3

Rushmoor

10

5

9

1

6

1

2

1

0

0

2

0

0

0

1

Fareham

10

8

7

2

11

2

1

3

0

0

0

3

0

0

2

Gosport

0

1

0

1

1

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

Havant

10

10

6

5

5

2

6

4

0

0

1

3

0

0

2

Test Valley

2

4

6

1

2

1

2

0

0

0

2

1

1

0

2

Winchester

9

17

14

7

7

2

2

1

1

0

0

2

2

0

1

Eastleigh

15

19

11

7

6

8

1

3

1

0

3

9

0

0

1

New Forest

6

9

7

2

1

2

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

1

Totals

112

115

107

37

59

40

25

20

8

4

19

28

7

2

17

Current 'Live' Adverts as of 16th April 2008

Headteacher = 2

Deputy Headteacher = 1

Assistant Headteacher = 1

Head of Department = 1

Teaching =44 of Which English = 2; Maths = 6; Science = 3; PE = 8; ICT = 0; Art =5; Tech = 2;

Music = 3; Geography = 3; Food Tech = 1; History = 2; MFL = 3; Sen = 1; MFL = 3; Misc = 5' Humanities = 1

Drama = 1;

Annexe G

Hampshire 2007/8 Newly Qualified Teachers leaving profession

 

 

Title

DfES

Birth yy

Resig reason

No. of terms completed*

College**

Qual***

 

Ms

4119

60

Suitability of post

1.5

 

 

 

Miss

2616

85

Contract end

1

BRITN

BED

 

Mr

2620

72

Moving away

3

BRUNL

PGCE

 

Miss

3600

85

Stress

0

BRUNL

BED

 

Miss

5204

82

Contract end

1

BRUNL

PGCE

 

Mr

4163

77

Contract end

2

BUWE

PGCE

 

Miss

4184

84

Sickness

0

BUWE

PGCE

 

Miss

3185

82

Contract end

1

CEB

PGCE

 

Miss

2020

71

Contract end

1.5

CHICH

BED

 

Mr

2168

84

Sickness

0

CHICH

BED

 

Miss

2239

71

Contract end

1

CHICH

BED

 

Miss

2767

83

Contract end

1

CHICH

PGCE

 

Mr

4182

60

Capability

 

CHICH

PGCE

 

Miss

3667

85

Contract end

1.5

EXETR

PGCE

 

Mr

4149

63

Stress

0

KING

BED

 

Miss

4315

84

Stress

0

LEEDS

PGCE

 

Miss

2512

85

Contract end

1

MANC

BED

 

Miss

4136

80

Contract end

2

NEWC

BED

 

Mrs

4169

65

Suitability of post

1

NOTTM

PGCE

 

Mrs

3050

56

Contract end

1

OTHER

OTT

 

Mrs

5414

70

Contract end

2.5

OU

GTP

 

Miss

3124

80

Stress leaving teaching

1.5

PLYM

BED

 

Miss

4110

84

Sickness

0

PORT

PGCE

 

Miss

4127

79

Capability

1

PORT

PGCE

 

Mr

4149

82

No longer wants to teach

1

PORT

PGCE

 

Mrs

4164

77

Capability

2

PORT

PGCE

 

Mr

4191

81

No longer wants to teach

1

PORT

PGCE

 

Miss

2613

82

Contract end

1

READG

GTP

 

Mr

4002

50

Capability

2.5

READG

GTP

 

Miss

4117

83

Moving away

1

READG

GTP

 

Mrs

5407

62

Contract end

1

READG

GTP

 

Miss

3112

86

Contract end

1

ROEUS

BED

 

Miss

5209

82

Contract end

2

SCITT

PGCE

 

Miss

2009

73

Contract end

2

SOTON

PGCE

 

Miss

2030

81

Suitability of post

1

SOTON

PGCE

 

Ms

4119

85

Capability

2.5

SOTON

PGCE

 

Ms

4127

81

Sickness

1

SOTON

PGCE

 

Mrs

4164

75

Contract end

2

SOTON

GTP

 

Mr

4174

82

Stress (vg teacher)

0

SOTON

PGCE

 

Mr

4182

61

Suitability of post

2

SOTON

PGCE

 

Mr

4182

85

Capability

2

SOTON

PGCE

 

Mrs

5402

64

Capability

1

SOTON

PGCE

 

Miss

4169

72

No longer wants to teach

0

SUSX

BED

 

Mr

4136

66

Capability

3.5

WABER

PGCE

 

Mrs

2069

66

Capability

1.5

WINCH

PGCE

 

Mrs

2228

85

Stress leaving teaching

2

WINCH

BED

 

Mr

3112

79

Capability

0

WINCH

PGCE

 

Mr

3199

84

Capability

2

WINCH

PGCE

 

Mrs

3341

67

Personal/family

2.5

WINCH

BED

 

Miss

3669

85

Capability

1.5

WINCH

BED

 

Miss

5204

85

Personal/family

1.5

WINCH

BED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*NQTs must complete 3 terms to qualify.

**Key to qualifications

 

**Key to colleges

 

PGCE

Post Graduate Certificate in Education

BRITN

Brighton

 

GTP

Graduate Teacher Programme

BRUNL

Brunel

 

BED

Batchelor of Education

BUWE

University of West England

OTT

Overseas Trained Teacher

CEB

Central England Birmingham

 

 

 

 

CHICH

Chichester

 

 

 

 

 

EXETR

Exeter

 

 

 

 

 

 

KING

Kingston

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEEDS

Leeds

 

 

 

 

 

 

MANC

Manchester

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEWC

Newcastle

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTTM

Nottingham

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

OU

Open University

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLYM

Plymouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

PORT

Portsmouth

 

 

 

 

 

 

READG

Reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROEUS

Roehampton

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCITT

School based initial teacher training

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOTON

Southampton

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUSX

Sussex

 

 

 

 

 

 

WABER

Aberistwith

 

 

 

 

 

 

WINCH

Winchester

 

 

 

 

 

Hampshire County Council

Children and Young People Select Committee

Review of Recruitment and Retention of Teachers and Headteachers

References

Witnesses' written evidence and a list of stakeholders providing evidence to this review can be found on the Children and Young People Select Committee's pages of the Hampshire County Council Scrutiny website at www.hants.gov.uk/scrutiny

Other references:

¬ Teachernet web pages on recruitment and retention:

http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/management/staffingandprofessionaldevelopment/recruitment/

¬ National College for School Leadership website publications:

¬ General Teaching Council publications:

¬ Hampshire County Council publications, policy and strategy:

¬ Department for Children Schools and Families guidance and publications:

¬ National Foundation for Educational Research

For further information about this report, please contact:

Emma Gordon, Scrutiny Officer

Tel: 01962 847567

emma.gordon@hants.gov.uk

1 * This is a rough comparison as Hampshire job advert data does not cover those Hampshire schools which undertake their own recruitment

2 DCSF School workforce data, January 2008 (revised) table C2

3 DCSF School workforce data, January 2008 (revised) table C1

4 DCSF School workforce data, January 2008 (revised) table D2

5 DCSF School workforce data, January 2008 (revised) table D4

6 DCSF School Workforce in England, January 2008, table 23

7 Recruitment and retention on initial teacher training: A systematic review, NFER

8 Recruitment and retention on initial teacher training: A systematic review, NFER, 2007

9 Factors Affecting Teachers' Decisions to Leave the Profession, 2003

10 National Union of Teachers website: Teachers' Pay 2008-11

11 Leadership Succession: An Overview. National College for School Leadership

12 ibid

13 Why people choose to become teachers and the factors influencing their choice of initial teacher training route: early findings from the becoming a teacher (BaT) project, DfES 2004.

14 Recruitment and retention on initial teacher training: A systematic review, NFER, 2007

15 Leadership Succession: An Overview, National College for School Leadership