Hampshire, Portsmouth and Southampton

Minerals and Waste Local Plan:
Adopted December 1998

Sand and Gravel

Main Contents Page

Alternative Aggregates

Secondary Aggregates

5. Meeting the Need for Minerals

Marine-Dredged Sand And Gravel

Chalk

Geology

Crushed Rock

Clay

Sand And Gravel

Secondary Or Substitute Aggregate Materials

Borrow Pits

Chalk

Aggregates Supply

Oil And Gas

Clay

Preferred Areas For Sand And Gravel Extraction

Minerals Processing And Manufacturing Plant

Borrow Pits

Alternative Aggregates

Mineral Exploration

Oil And Gas

Aggregates Wharves And Depots

 

5.3 Sand and gravel occurs as lower terrace or valley gravel deposits, particularly in the Avon, Test, Itchen and Blackwater river valleys. It also occurs as upper terrace or plateau gravels, which are present within parts of the London and Hampshire Basin areas, especially in Ringwood Forest, adjacent to the coast and Southampton Water, around Romsey, and in the Eversley/Bramshill area. Valley gravel deposits usually extend below the watertable, whereas plateau gravels lie mainly above it. Solid sand occurs within the Wealden Edge area and at locations within the Hampshire Basin, particularly in Ringwood Forest and around Romsey and Fair Oak. Sand and gravel and solid sand are dealt with together in this Plan as they are both aggregate minerals. They are jointly referred to hereafter as sand and gravel.

5.4 Sand and gravel is subdivided into: sharp or concreting sand and gravel; and soft or building sand. Sharp sand and gravel is mainly used for making concrete and concrete products, for which purpose it has to be washed and graded. It is also used as drainage material and as constructional base material. Unwashed or as-raised sand and gravel is used as constructional fill material and for surfacing tracks and paths. This material is often known as hoggin when the clay content acts as a self-binding agent. Soft sand is mainly used in making mortar and asphalt, but sands which do not meet specifications for those uses can be used as constructional fill material.

5.5 Production of sand and gravel and solid sand from mineral working sites in Hampshire has averaged around three million tonnes a year over the period 1975 to 1996. Of this, approximately 18 per cent has been soft sand and 82 per cent sharp sand and gravel (including hoggin). There are currently (December 1998) 28 sand and gravel production sites which are active, 1 dormant site, and a further 2 permitted sites which have not yet commenced working.

5.6 The production of sand and gravel over the years 1985-1996 is shown in Table 1. Whilst average annual production was about three million tonnes over the period 1985 to 1989, it fell to an average of about 2.6 million tonnes for the period 1990 to 1996 (a decrease of thirteen per cent). In 1992 production was only 2.27 million tonnes, 24 per cent below the 1985 to 1989 average level, although it increased to 2.76 million tonnes in 1994, but fell again to 2.31 million tonnes in 1996. This reduction is mainly a result of economic recession.

5.7 Over the period 1985 to 1996 almost half of the total County production came from south-west Hampshire (west of Lyndhurst/Lymington), mostly from the Avon Valley area, with about a quarter each coming from north Hampshire (north of Andover/Winchester/Petersfield) and from south Hampshire (the remainder of the County). Production in south Hampshire has fallen from around 1.4 million tonnes a year in the late 1970s to around 0.70 million tonnes a year in the early 1990s. This reflects the depletion of available unconstrained resources and the increased availability of marine-dredged sand and gravel and imported crushed rock in that part of the County. Production has correspondingly increased since the 1970s in south-west Hampshire, which has traditionally supplied sand and gravel to the Bournemouth/Poole area. However production from that part of the County fell from around 1.5 million tonnes a year in the late 1980s to around 1.2 million tonnes in more recent years. In north Hampshire production has remained at around 0.6 to 0.7 million tonnes a year over the last 15 years or so.

Table 1: Production of Land-Won Sand and Gravel in Hampshire 1985 - 1996

Year

Production (million tonnes)

 

Soft Sand

Sharp Sand and Gravel

Total Sand and Gravel

1985

0.51

2.44

2.95

1987

0.44

2.18

2.63

1989

0.64

2.74

3.38

1990

0.47

2.25

2.72

1991

0.45

2.62

3.07

1992

0.46

1.81

2.27

1993

0.46

2.14

2.60

1994

0.55

2.20

2.76

1995

0.49

2.07

2.56

1996

0.57

1.74

2.31

Average 1985-89

0.53

2.45

2.99

Average 1990-96

0.49

2.12

2.61

Source: SERAWP Annual Monitoring Surveys

(Figures do not all sum due to rounding)

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