Hampshire, Portsmouth and Southampton

Minerals and Waste Local Plan:
Adopted December 1998

Secondary or Substitute Aggregate Materials

Main Contents Page

Alternative Aggregates

Secondary Aggregates

5. Meeting the Need for Minerals

Marine-Dredged Sand And Gravel

Chalk

Geology

Crushed Rock

Clay

Sand And Gravel

Secondary Or Substitute Aggregate Materials

Borrow Pits

Chalk

Aggregates Supply

Oil And Gas

Clay

Preferred Areas For Sand And Gravel Extraction

Minerals Processing And Manufacturing Plant

Borrow Pits

Alternative Aggregates

Mineral Exploration

Oil And Gas

Aggregates Wharves And Depots

 

5.19 Secondary or substitute aggregate materials include mineral wastes, (e.g. china clay sand, slate waste and colliery shale), power station ash, and recycled crushed concrete and road planings. A recent research report prepared by Arup Economic Consultants for the DoE - 'Occurrence and Utilisation of Mineral Wastes' (1991) - has indicated the potential of these materials for use as aggregates and has made recommendations to encourage their increased use. Such materials have not been used in Hampshire to any significant extent in the past, although power station ash was brought by rail from Didcot for use in a major construction project in Southampton in 1975/76. The only materials which seem likely to be available in or close to Hampshire for the foreseeable future are construction and demolition waste, particularly concrete, and road planings. Small quantities of crushed concrete are already being produced, mainly from construction and demolition waste crushing and recycling plants in Hampshire. The material is mostly used as constructional fill. The potential use of these materials for other purposes, such as in concrete and road construction, depends on a variety of factors. These include the ability of plants and operators to meet aggregate specifications, the provision of encouragement and incentives by Government, and the establishment of well located permanent sites that will allow for the development of high capacity sophisticated plant. An increasing number of small aggregate recycling plants are being established in Hampshire and a large-scale plant was until recently in operation at Warren Farm Quarry, Fareham. In the longer term it is likely that several sites for large recycled aggregate production plants will be needed across Hampshire.

5.20 A further research report prepared by Howard Humphreys and Partners for the DoE - 'Managing Demolition and Construction Wastes' (1994) looks at the recycling of demolition and construction wastes and their use as aggregates. The study indicates that some 63 per cent (44 million tonnes a year) of demolition and construction waste arisings are currently recycled in some way but that only 4 per cent (2.8 million tonnes) is recycled for secondary aggregate use: the majority of recycled material is employed in low level uses on or near to the site of arising or in landfill engineering. The report recommends that a national target level for the recycling of demolition and construction waste of 75 per cent be set for the year 2005 and that the amount of graded aggregate produced from recycled material should be doubled to 5 million tonnes a year.

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