Hampshire, Portsmouth and Southampton

Minerals and Waste Local Plan:
Adopted December 1998

Aggregates Supply

Main Contents Page

Alternative Aggregates

Secondary Aggregates

5. Meeting the Need for Minerals

Marine-Dredged Sand And Gravel

Chalk

Geology

Crushed Rock

Clay

Sand And Gravel

Secondary Or Substitute Aggregate Materials

Borrow Pits

Chalk

Aggregates Supply

Oil And Gas

Clay

Preferred Areas For Sand And Gravel Extraction

Minerals Processing And Manufacturing Plant

Borrow Pits

Alternative Aggregates

Mineral Exploration

Oil And Gas

Aggregates Wharves And Depots

 

5.21 As explained in Chapter 2, under current national policy guidance on the supply of aggregates and the 1994 sub-regional apportionment of the regional sand and gravel requirement for the South East in MPG6, Hampshire's share of land-won supply from within the South East region is 2.7 million tonnes of sand and gravel a year. This is the apportionment of total regional production which Hampshire should seek to provide for. It relates to the period to 2006. This apportionment figure is for testing through the development plan process, as referred to in paragraph 2.11.

5.22 The balance of, and any increase in, the need for aggregates is to be met by landings of marine-dredged sand and gravel, imports of crushed rock (principally by rail and sea) and the use of secondary or substitute aggregate materials. Already, less than half of the need for aggregates in Hampshire is met by local land-won sand and gravel. Demand for aggregates has been forecast by the Government to increase and therefore the proportion of aggregates consumption that is met by alternative aggregate materials is expected to increase as the supply of land-won materials decreases.



5.23 Provision needs to be made to enable the production of 2.7 million tonnes of land-won sand and gravel a year from sites within Hampshire over the Plan period (i.e. to the end of 2001). This includes production from borrow pits. However, within this overall annual production level, it is assumed that production of soft sand will increase at the forecast rate of increase in demand for aggregates, with a corresponding decrease in production of sharp sand and gravel. This is because there are no readily available alternatives to local land-won soft sand. Notwithstanding the conclusions of the Wessex Aggregates Study, in view of the strong environmental constraints on the working of sand and gravel in south west Hampshire, particularly in the New Forest Heritage Area, the Mineral Planning Authorities believe that no further provision should be made for production of land-won sand and gravel to supply Dorset and Wiltshire over and above that which is already included in the production level of 2.7 million tonnes a year.

5.24 The supply requirement for land-won sand and gravel, split between soft sand and sharp sand and gravel, over the period 1992-2008 is shown in Table 2. The Table is divided into the periods 1992-1996, 1997-2001 and 2002-2008, showing the total supply requirement and annual average supply level for each of these three periods. Policy 16 will enable the Mineral Planning Authorities to control closely the release of land for sand and gravel extraction so that no more land is permitted at any one time than is necessary for the required level of production. In this way the Mineral Planning Authorities will aim to prevent production of land-won sand and gravel in excess of the agreed level for the County.

5.25 Table 2 shows supply requirements for land-won sand and gravel for the County as a whole. However, the geographical spread of sand and gravel deposits and hence of potential extraction sites is uneven. The largest areas of remaining sand and gravel resources are in south west Hampshire, particularly the Avon Valley, Ringwood Forest and the area around New Milton and Lymington. Significant resources also remain in north Hampshire, particularly in the Bramshill, Mortimer West End, and Bordon areas. Remaining resources in south Hampshire tend to be fragmented although sizeable areas of deposits occur in the Romsey, Netley and Stubbington areas.

Table 2: Land-Won Sand and Gravel Supply Requirement 1992 - 2008

(All figures in million tonnes)

 

Soft Sand

Sharp Sand & Gravel

Total Sand & Gravel

Average Production 1990-96

0.49

2.12

2.61

Supply

Requirement:

Annual Average

Total for Period

Annual Average

Total for Period

Annual Average

Total for Period

Plan Period:

1992-1996

0.49

2.44

2.21

11.06

2.7

13.50

1997-2001

0.57

2.83

2.13

10.67

2.7

13.50

Landbank Period:

2002-2008

0.68

4.74

2.02

14.16

2.7

18.90

Total Supply Requirement

1992-2008

 

10.01

 

35.89

 

45.90




5.26 In view of the uneven distribution of sand and gravel resources it is inevitable that future production will also be unevenly distributed, since minerals can only be extracted from where they exist in the ground. Therefore, it is expected that south west Hampshire will continue to be the County's main sand and gravel extraction area providing around a half of total production. However, within these geological limits it is important that a spread of sand and gravel production is maintained across the County to enable local markets to be supplied and to minimise long distance movements of aggregates by road. Therefore the Mineral Planning Authorities will seek to ensure that, as far as is practicable, sand and gravel extraction sites are distributed throughout the main resource areas of the County. The Mineral Planning Authorities will also seek to minimise the concentration of mineral workings and consequent environmental and traffic impact in any one part of the County. Having regard to Policy 7(xii), permission will not be granted for further mineral working in close proximity to existing operations within any particular locality where this would lead to an unacceptable increase in the cumulative environmental or traffic impact of mineral working on that locality.

5.27 The April 1994 version of MPG6 says mineral planning authorities should aim to maintain a landbank of aggregate minerals sufficient for at least seven years' extraction. In accordance with this Government policy guidance, the Mineral Planning Authorities will aim to provide for the maintenance of a landbank of permitted reserves of sand and gravel sufficient for at least seven years' production unless exceptional circumstances prevail. This figure will be reviewed in the event of a change in national or regional policy guidance. In calculating landbank requirement figures, the Mineral Planning Authorities will have regard to the supply requirement figures set out in Table 2. On the basis of an average production level of 2.7 million tonnes a year for Hampshire until 2001, the overall landbank requirement for the County is 18.9 million tonnes. However, the achievement and maintenance of this will depend on the submission of sufficient planning applications by the minerals industry for the working of sites that are environmentally acceptable. Permission will not be granted for the extraction of sand and gravel from sites that are not acceptable even if the landbank is below the required level.

5.28 Whilst the period of this Plan is up to the end of 2001, in order to ensure a seven-year landbank of permitted reserves at that date it will be necessary for enough permissions to have been granted by then to provide for the following seven-year period, i.e. up to the end of 2008. Following the advice in MPG6, in addition to seeking to maintain an overall seven-year landbank of sand and gravel, the Mineral Planning Authorities will seek to maintain seven-year landbanks of both soft sand and sharp sand and gravel. The landbank requirements at any particular time will be calculated on the basis of the forecast supply requirement figures in Table 2.

5.29 For the purposes of calculating landbanks, all reserves of sand and gravel will be included, regardless of whether or not they are likely to be worked within the next seven years. The preferred areas identified in this Plan will not be included as part of the landbank unless planning permission for mineral extraction has been granted.

5.30 The Mineral Planning Authorities will not be prepared to grant permission for sand and gravel extraction in order to meet a shortfall in a landbank requirement if, by doing so, the supply requirement in Table 2 would be exceeded. However, permission may be granted in such circumstances if the phasing of working of the site can be ensured such that mineral extraction would not take place until such time as it is needed in order to meet the supply requirement and that the supply requirement is not likely to be exceeded. Whilst it may, in some circumstances, be possible to ensure this by condition, it is more likely that control by means of a legal agreement would be necessary.

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