Hampshire Treasures

Volume 1 ( Winchester City District)

Page 299 - Upham

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The Parish of Upham in the Hundred of Bishop's Waltham was mentioned as a tithing in a court roll dated 1236. The modern Parish of Upham, which includes the Wintershill estate, formed part of the Manor of Bishop's Waltham in the Middle Ages.

The Wintershill estate is first recorded in 1420, and later passed to Edward Upham. I n 1500 the estate was elevated to the status of a manor, and was occupied by various families through the centuries. The original manor-house became Durley Hall Farm, the sixteenth century ruin which is now within the boundary of Durley Parish. The modern Wintershill Hall was built in 1852.

The old poor-house at Upham has now been converted into cottages, but one of the rules read: "That all persons, both men, women and children, shall attend Divine Service every Sunday morning at eleven o'clock, or else go without dinner, except such as are not able by infirmity or age."

Brushmaking was once a flourishing industry in Upham, and a local inn called the Brushmakers Arms perpetuates the name of the trade. During the Civil War the church was used by a cavalry regiment, as an entry (11 th April 1642) in the Churchwardens' accounts reads: "For cleansing the church against Christmas, after the troopers had abused it for a stable for their horses, 2s 6d."

In 1684 Edward Young, author of "Night Thoughts" and other works, was born in Upham Rectory but moved away when he was still a boy.

Please use "Next page" to see Hampshire Treasures entries for Upham.

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