Hampshire Treasures

Volume 1 ( Winchester City District)

Page 305 - Warnford

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Before the Norman Conquest there seem to have been two manors at Warnford, one held by King Edward and the other by Hyde Abbey, but at the time of the Domesday Survey Hugh de Port held them both and they soon came to be regarded as one manor. The manor changed hands many times, having remained with the de Ports until the thirteenth century. In 1551 the manor came to the Paulet family, then at the end of the century to the Neales. In 1678 Thomas Neale sold it to Richard Woollaston and thence it passed to the Bouveries and the de Burghs and in 1865 to the Woods of Warnford.

The church, which contains possible pre-Conquest remains, was almost entirely rebuilt towards the end of the twelfth century by Adam de Port.

The early village appears to have been beside the church until medieval times, when it was moved to its present site. This shift in settlement was probably the result of the building of a later manor house and park.

Close by the church Adam de Port's son, St. John, built the twelfth century house, whose great ruined aisled hall, popularly known as King John's Lodge, probably derived its name from that of the family.

In 1752 a water-mill and a paper-mill belonged to the manorand they were still standing in 1826. Papermill Cottage probably marks the site of the paper-mill, which was probably the earliest of its kind in Hampshire. Warnford has also been known for its trout fishing and watercress beds.

Please use "Next page" to see Hampshire Treasures entries for Warnford.

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