Hampshire Treasures

Volume 6 ( East Hampshire)

Page 205 - Langrish

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The parish of Langrish was formed in 1894 and included the tithings of Bordean, Langrish, Ramsdean and part of Stroud Common, all these having been in the parish of East Meon. In 1932 part of the civil parish was transferred to Petersfield urban district.

Langrish was a sub-manor dependent upon the manor of east Meon, and was held by John Langrish in 1419. The property continued in the Langrish family until the seventeenth century when it was sold to the Long family. In 1719 the manor was sold to Thomas Ridge of Portsmouth but his son Thomas was declared bankrupt in 1764 and the estate was auctioned to William Joliffe of Petersfield in 1771.

The tithing of Borndean occupies high ground in the parish and contained lime-works for many years; in 1649 William Musgrave was fined sixpence for offending his neighbours by emptying his lime-pits and throwing his skins into the water. The village of Ramsdean once had a pond but this was filled in in the early 1930s, the place is now known as Ramsdean Green but the pond is commemorated by the nearby Pond Cottages.

The relatively low-lying land of Stroud Common yielded clay for making bricks, tiles and pipes. In 1571 John Robynnet obtained a licence to dig clay on some waste land for the purposes of making bricks and tiles, and the industry continued into the present century.

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