Hampshire Treasures

Volume 7 ( Havant)

Page 66 - Hayling West

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Description and DateRemarksProtectionGrid Ref. and
Punchcard No.
Trees
Newtown House Hotel, Manor Road. A group of austrian pine, and sycamore, weeping willow, oak, and monterey cypress standing separately, all in the hotel grounds.     T.P.O. No. 1079
SZ 715 998
1105 340
Trees
St. Francis De Sales School, Beach Road. A group consisting mainly of holm oak, with oak and beech, and monterey pine, holm oak, and lime standing separately, all in the school grounds.     T.P.O. No. 1086
SZ 715 990
1105 341
Tree
Site of Old Vicarage, Beach Road. A fine specimen of an evergreen oak.     SZ 715 993
1105 214
Trees and Shrubs
Sinah Warren, Ferry Road. A large collection of mixed deciduous and coniferous varieties, a habitat for many wild birds.     SZ 696 997
1105 215
Woodland
Honeyring Copse, junction of Church Road and Manor Road. Centred on grid reference given.     SU 721 006
1105 227
Tree
St. Mary's Churchyard. An ancient yew, its' girth of 32 ft. is believed to be the largest in Hampshire. Ref: Churchyard and Immorality, (Cornish).     SU 722 000
1105 223
Woodland
Pound Copse, junction of Church Road and Manor Road. Reference given locates the centre.     SU 723 006
1105 228
Trees
Manor House, Manor Farm and environs. Mixed varieties including many fine oaks, forming an attractive setting to both the manor and the farm.     SU 721 009
1105 229
Trees
Station Road, West Town. Line of conifers and fine single oak opposite.     SZ 710 997
1105 232
Tree
Opposite Barley Mow Inn, West Town. Fine specimen of chestnut, one of the few large trees in this area.     SZ 711 996
1105 233
Woodland
Opposite western end of Avenue Road and extending northwards along Havant Road. Attractive wooded area between road and shore.     SU 718 034
1105 238
Sarsen Stones
St. Mary's Church. Flanking the south door, also two used as gravestones. Many are to be found in this area, they may originally have been incorporated in blocks of floating ice, which would account for their occasional presence in Pleitocene and Holocene gravels, later to form beach shingle. Ref: Sarsens, 1946, (Brentall), pp.419-439.     SU 722 000
1105 193
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