Hampshire Treasures

Volume 13 ( Eastleigh)

Page 7 - Botley

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Situated five miles east of Southampton, this long, funnel-shaped parish lies at the head of the tidal reach of the River Hamble. The pleasant old market town is called Botelie in the Domesday Book, and was held from Edward the Confessor by a man called Cheping who was dispossessed by Ralph de Mortimer at the time of the Conquest. During the 13th century John of Botley, Lord of the Manor, obtained a charter from Henry III for holding a fair and market here. Botley was the home of William Cobbet from 1806-1826 and there is a memorial stone at Mill Hill. The church of All Saints was built in 1836 and contains some old bells from the earlier church which is now disused and dates from the 13th century. The area is famous for its strawberries which are grown in large quantities together with other market produce. There are many acres of meadow and woodland along the Hamble River preserved by the National Trust and Hampshire County Council. A prehistoric dug-out boat was found in the river bed, and presented to Southampton Museum.

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