Woolly worms

Hiding nearby, worms of multicolour, child predators collect but how many do they need to survive and which ones were pesticided?

Overview

Hiding nearby, worms of multicolour, child predators collect but how many do they need to survive and which ones were pesticided?

Camouflage, mimicry, preys, foodchains.

Programme of study

To use food chains to show feeding relationships in a habitat (Sc2 5d).

Learning objective
  • Children will explain why certain colours are found early and others later - camouflage
  • Children will consider implications of pesticide entering food chain on predator and prey
Activity
  • Use wool of six colours - red, yellow, blue, green, black, brown - approximately 10 cm lengths
  • Enough for 8 or so pieces per child
  • Two groups hide their worms over two defined areas - hedge, field edge etc.
  • Swap and search, collect as many worms as possible, return to find their own worms
  • No worms, you are dead
  • One worm, you are dead
  • Blue worms don’t count they are distasteful
  • Yellow worms contain pesticide, if you have one yellow then remove two good worms, if you have two yellows then you have toxic overload - you are dead! Go to creature heaven

Over three-quarters of song thrushes are now gone from our countryside. These birds feed on snails, slug pellets kill off snails therefore there is less food for the thrushes. Slug pellets and other pesticides are used in huge quantities in agriculture. One mouthful will kill a dog.