Personal Education Plan (PEP)

The education part of a looked-after child's care plan

A Personal Education Plan (PEP) is a statutory active document for a looked-after child. It forms the education part of the child's Care Plan.

The PEP sets out the child's:

  • identified needs
  • school history
  • targets for educational progress, attainment and achievement, and the support in place to secure these targets
  • views about their own education and aspirations for the future (discussed in partnership with social workers, parents and carers)

Each looked-after child should feel that the PEP is relevant to their needs and other aspects of their lives. It is important to listen to and involve the child in a positive, supportive way during the PEP process.

Hampshire and Isle of Wight PEP Templates
Early Years PEP data form and guidance

Early Years optional supplementary PEP forms

The forms below are optional for schools and settings to use as required.
They are word versions of the pupil voice, parent/carer and social worker sections of the Hants and IOW PEP forms.
They can be sent/used to collate the input from the different stakeholders in advance of the meeting; and then cut and pasted into the data form itself:

Reception Year PEP data form and guidance

Supplementary Year R PEP forms

The forms below are optional for schools and settings to use as required.
They are word versions of the pupil voice, parent/carer and social worker sections of the Hants and IOW PEP forms.
They can be sent/used to collate the input from the different stakeholders in advance of the meeting; and then cut and pasted into the data form itself:

Key Stage 1 and 2 PEP data forms and guidance

Optional supplementary PEP forms

The forms below are optional for schools and settings to use as required.
They are word versions of the pupil voice, parent/carer and social worker sections of the Hants and IOW PEP forms.
They can be sent/used to collate the input from the different stakeholders in advance of the meeting; and then cut and pasted into the data form itself:

Secondary PEP data forms and guidance

Optional supplementary PEP forms

The forms below are optional for schools and settings to use as required.
They are word versions of the pupil voice, parent/carer and social worker sections of the Hants and IOW PEP forms.
They can be sent/used to collate the input from the different stakeholders in advance of the meeting; and then cut and pasted into the data form itself:

Students with EHCP (All years) data forms and guidance

Optional supplementary PEP forms

The forms below are optional for schools and settings to use as required.
They are word versions of the pupil voice, parent/carer and social worker sections of the Hants and IOW PEP forms.
They can be sent/used to collate the input from the different stakeholders in advance of the meeting; and then cut and pasted into the data form itself:

Post 16 PEP form and guidance

Initial PEP for unaccompanied asylum seekers data form and guidance
Guidance
Statutory guidance

The government has published statutory guidance for local authorities, Promoting the educational achievement of looked-after children. It states that all looked-after children must have a Personal Education Plan (PEP).

Local authorities have a duty to promote the educational achievement of looked-after children under section 52 of the Children Act 2004. They must ensure all looked-after children from age three have an effective, robust and up-to-date PEP.

The designated teacher should ensure that the PEP is an effective tool to help the school support the child's educational progress.

Organising PEP meetings

First PEP meeting

The social worker will arrange the first PEP meeting date.

  • For a child new to care and of statutory school age, the first PEP meeting will be held within 20 days of them coming into care
  • For a child placed in emergency care, the first PEP meeting will be held within 10 working days of them coming into care, wherever they are placed

Ongoing PEP meetings

The social worker will liaise with schools and other parties to arrange ongoing PEP meetings.

For every looked-after child of statutory school age, it is a legal requirement to hold at least two PEP meetings each academic year. The PEP meeting should take place before the child's statutory care plan review, held every six months.

It is effective practice to hold three PEP meetings per year (one per term). Holding regular PEP meetings ensures that:

  • plans are always based on current information
  • plans continue to meet the child's educational needs
  • information from the PEP is available at the next statutory care plan review

PEP toolkit and training

The PEP toolkit enables professionals to identify areas of need that may impact on the educational outcomes for a vulnerable child. It offers practical guidance on how to meet these needs and raise attainment.

The toolkit is divided into two sections:

  1. a needs identification tool to identify behaviours, skill deficits, cognitions and emotional difficulties that affect learning
  2. a chapter devoted to each area of need, with practical guidance on how best to meet these needs.

To access the PEP toolkit, you will need to attend a training day.

Role of the virtual school in PEP monitoring

The 1989 Children Act (as amended under section 52 of the Children Act 2004) places a duty on local authorities to promote the educational achievement of looked-after children. All looked-after children from age three must have an effective, robust and up-to-date PEP. Schools are expected to be proactive in supporting the local authority in its duty.

The PEP is the joint responsibility of the local authority and the school.

Hampshire and Isle of Wight Virtual School undertakes regular PEP monitoring activities:

  • Calendared PEP monitoring weeks to review the quality and agree further actions to improve effectiveness
  • Representatives of the virtual school will be present at PEP meetings as necessary
  • School visits where a review of the PEPs of all looked-after children on roll will be carried out

Adopted children

Many adopted children will have suffered trauma in their birth families and will have been looked-after before their move to their adoptive families.

Schools should be aware that adopted children continue to have similar needs as when they were looked-after. Often these needs will have been exacerbated by the move to adoption.