Death in service

Firefighters' Pension Scheme 1992

Death grant

A death grant will be paid if you die while you are paying into the FPS. The death grant will be two times your pay at your time of death.

  • Your actual pay will be used if you work part time. If you worked variable hours, it will be taken into account
  • If you were absent from duty, the death grant will be based on your pay immediately before the absence began

If you have taken the two pension option because of a drop in pay, the death grant will be the best of:

  • two times your pensionable pay at date of death or
  • a proportion of the grant based on your pay at the date benefits were split, plus a proportion based on pay at the date of death

The death grant will be paid to:

  • your husband, wife or civil partner
  • your representatives, if you were not married or in a civil partnership
  • your representatives if you were living apart from your spouse or civil partner, meaning that your relationship had ended
Partner's pension

If you die in service and while paying into the FPS, your husband, wife or civil partner will receive a pension. The pension will be based on your pensionable service and pay, and if you worked part-time, it will be taken into account.

A partner's full pension is:

  • for the first 13 weeks, pension equal to your pensionable pay
  • after that, half of the pension that you would have been entitled to with service enhanced in the same way as an ill health pension

Your partner will not receive a pension if you are not married or in a civil partnership with him or her.

Living apart from your husband or wife

If you are living separately from your husband or wife at your date of death, his or her pension will be based on your pensionable service after 5 April 1978. If your spouse's full pension (what would have been paid if you weren't living apart) would have been higher, it will be calculated as above and then:

  • it may be increased to equal the amount of any maintenance contributions that were paying, or were liable to pay to support your spouse and/or any children. The total pension cannot be higher than the partner's full pension, or
  • the pension could be increased to the full pension at Hampshire Fire and Rescue Authority's discretion
Civil partner's pension

If you die whilst in a registered civil partnership, your partner's pension would be based on your service after 5 April 1988.

Service before April 1972

Your partner's pension may be different if you were serving before April 1972 – please contact Pensions Services if you need more information.

Children's pensions

If you die in service, whilst contributing to the FPS, your children will receive a pension if they are eligible. How much they will receive depends on their circumstances when you die.

Eligible children who have a surviving parent:

  • If you have one or two eligible children, each child will receive 18.75% of the combined lower and higher tier ill-health pensions
  • If you have three or more eligible children, they will receive 37.5% of the combined lower and higher-tier ill-health pensions, shared between them

Eligible children who do not have a surviving parent:

  • If you have one or two eligible children, each one will receive 25% of the combined lower and higher tier ill-health pensions
  • If you have three or more eligible children, they will receive 50% of the combined lower and higher-tier ill-health pensions, shared between them
Dependent relatives

A payment, called a dependent relative's gratuity may be made to a relative if you die in service, or once your pension is being paid.

  • Hampshire Fire and Rescue has absolute discretion as to whether or not to pay a dependent relative's gratuity
  • The payment can only be made to someone who is not eligible for a pension or other payment from the FPS
  • The relative must be your spouse, civil partner or child if they are not eligible for a pension or other payment or
  • They must be your parent, grandparent or any child of these relatives
  • They must be substantially dependent on you when you die